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New Mexico State University
Graduate Catalog
2011-2012

ADDITIONAL GRADUATE COURSES

A S-ARTS AND SCIENCES

A S 500. Inquiry-Based Science Education 1-3 cr.
Topics in middle school science education, with emphasis on inquiry-based learning and development of inquiry based learning modules. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

CMI- CREATIVE MEDIA INSTITUTE

CMI 450. Advanced 2-D Animation 3 cr.
Advanced techniques in two dimensional animation including motion graphics and integration of live action. Prerequisite: CMI 350
CMI 451. Effects Animation & Dynamic Simulation 3 cr.
Overview of 3D dynamic simulations and effects. Creative projects and practical examples including fluids, particles, fields, soft body, and rigid body techniques. Prerequisites: CMI 260 and permission of instructor.
CMI 460. Technical Direction for Animation 3 cr.
Principles and practices of current animation technical development. Preliminary and detailed technical design, including advanced rigging, UI customization, Mel scripting, expressions, rendering systems, and pipeline development. LC Campus Only. Prerequisites: CMI 260 and CMI 280 or consent of instructor.
CMI 470. Short 2-D Animation Production 3 cr.
This is a full-scale animation production class where students will be divided into teams according to the animation skills they have demonstrated in the beginning, intermediate, and advanced classes. Each team member will specialize in one important facet of the production process: character animation, background painting, technical direction, coloring, or story development and storyboarding. 4 to 8 minute animated shorts will be produced. Prerequisite(s): CMI 450, CMI 361.
CMI 480. Screenwriting II 3 cr.
Students will prepare 30-60 minute screenplays. Script analysis will be in a workshop format. Scripts will be read and discussed, scenes performed and reactions analyzed to consider effect of dialogue, character development, etc. Guest professionals will discuss their experience/expertise. Prerequisite(s): ENGL 309 or CMI 309 or THTR 306 or consent of instructor. Crosslisted with: ENGL 480
CMI 490. Advanced Screenwriting 3 cr.
Students will prepare a feature-length screenplay. Script analysis will be in an advanced workshop format. Scripts will be read and discussed, scenes performed and reactions analyzed to consider effect of dialogue, character development, etc. Aimed at preparing writers for the professional market. Consent of instructor required. Crosslisted with: ENGL 491
CMI 495. Internship 1-3 cr.
Placement in a production facility and supervised experience. Required. With CMI advisor approval only.
CMI 496. Media Law/Ethics 3 cr.
Overview of legal & ethical issues in creative media elements of business and commercial law. This class will focus on the fundamentals of entertainment law by exploring the business and legal relationships within film industries, and animation. Learn to anticipate and avoid legal problems prior to production. Key issues in the area of copyright law, sources of financing, distribution agreements; insurance and union consideration will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): CMI 100. Restricted to CMI majors.
CMI 497. Portfolio Design and Development 3 cr.
Advanced graphic design projects with an emphasis on conceptual development, portfolio preparation, and professional practices. Refine general marketing strategies, personal portfolio, and resumes. Define, target, and penetrate personal target markets. Students develop individual promotional/demo packages. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
CMI 498. Final Year Senior Project I: Production and Post Production 3-6 cr.
Senior thesis will be a yearlong concentration on a project guided by more than one faculty member. Will be narrative-driven and have an end product; short film, documentary, experimental 3-D animated short, or pilot and treatment for a TV series. Emphasis will be on preproduction. Student will produce a professional quality product that will help gain entry into a professional situation or graduate school. Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor.
CMI 499. Final Year Senior Project II: Production and Post Production 3-6 cr.
The senior thesis will be a year long concentration on a project guided by more than one faculty member. Will be narrative driven and have an end product; short film, documentary, experimental, 3-D animated short, or pilot and treatment for a TV series. Student will produce a professional quality product that will help gain entry into a professional situation or graduate school. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite(s): CMI 498 and Consent of Instructor.

CHSS- COmmunity HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES

CHSS 460. Health Disparities and Health Interventions 3 cr.
Exploration of culturally adapted health intervention strategies designed to address health disparities.
CHSS 470. Creation and Use of Media for Health and Social Services 3 cr. (2+2P)
Basic application and creation of media products in health and social services. Two hours of lectures plus two hours lab each week. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Restricted to HL S, BSN, BSNC, BSNR and HCS majors.

DANC- dance

DANC 450. Special Topics 1-3 cr.
Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
DANC 451V. World Dance 3 cr.
Examination of dance forms from a cross-cultural perspective, focusing on the role of dance in different cultures around the globe. Same as HON 347V.
DANC 460. Dance History 3 cr.
History and development of dance forms from ancient cultures to today.
DANC 465. Senior Culminating Experience 1-6 cr.
Exit course for graduating seniors. Students will apply comprehensive knowledge of performance and production and/or pedagogy experience, to culminate in a dance production and/or teaching project. Restricted to majors and minors. A minimum of 2 credit hours required for graduation.
DANC 466. Dance Pedagogy II 3 cr.
Teaching methods and class planning for dance curriculum at middle school and high school levels. Course must be passed with a grade of C or higher. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite(s): DANC 300 or consent of instructor.
DANC 489. Advanced Choreographic Project 3 cr.
Individual directed studies in choreography with a culminating performance. Consent of instructor required. Restricted to Grad Dance Students majors.
DANC 499. Problems 1-3 cr.
Problems in dance education, dance pedagogy, dance performance and independent work in their solutions. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Restricted to majors and minors.
DANC 501. Directed Studies 1-6 cr.
Supervised projects and/or research in theoretical studies, inclusive of community service projects. Consent of instructor required.
DANC 505. Dance Ensemble III 3 cr.
Rehearsal and performance of dance repertory with emphasis on advanced understanding of musicality, dynamic phrasing, artistic expression, and athletic versatility within a broad range of styles. Consent of instructor required.
DANC 550. Special Topics 1-6 cr.
Specific subjects offered in addition to standard academic curriculum. Course title to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Consent of instructor required.
DANC 551. Movement as Social Text 3 cr.
Investigation of the meaning of movement and dance in different cultural, social, and historical contexts in both Western and non-Western dance forms. Emphasis will be placed on the nature of movement, its unique properties, the ways in which it conveys meaning, and its relationship to culture and society. Consent of instructor required.
DANC 567. Dance Internship I 3 cr.
Internship opportunities in either dance education, dance performance/production, or dance administration. Internship site determined by both Director of Dance Program and graduate student.
DANC 568. Advanced Theory of Dance Technique 1-6 cr.
Advanced study of dance pedagogy, theory and practice of dance technique in one of the following styles of dance: ballet, modern, jazz, ballroom, Latin, tap, flamenco, ballet folklorico, or Spanish dance.
DANC 570. Dance Administration and Leadership 3 cr.
The study and investigation of both management and leadership theories and how to apply these theories in practice.
DANC 599. Master’s Thesis 3 cr.
This course is for graduate dance students who choose to write a thesis instead of a performance or teaching project.
DANC 600. Dance Research 3 cr.
Literature review and development of research in the field of dance.
DANC 670. Dance Internship II 3 cr.
Internship opportunities in either dance education, dance performance/production, or dance administration. Internship site determined by both Director of Dance Program and graduate student.
DANC 700. Doctoral Dissertation 3 cr.
This course is for graduate dance students working toward their EdD or PhD in dance. A dissertation is required. Topic and format to be determined by dissertation committee chair and graduate student. Consent of instructor required. Restricted to Graduate Dance Majors majors.

E T- ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

E T 454. Advanced Construction Technology 3 cr.
Contractor design and construction methods concerning formwork, special foundations, shoring, excavations, pilings, steel erection, and various material handling components. Prerequisite: E T 354 and E T 355.
E T 455. Cost Estimating and Scheduling 3 cr.
Methods and techniques in construction estimating including final bid preparation, construction planning and scheduling using various network methods and other techniques. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing in E T.
E T 456. Analysis of Physical Security Systems 3 cr.
The design, analysis and implementation of security systems and subsystems including threat detection and response, information and communications security, and physical protection. Prerequisite: junior standing.
E T 457. Introduction to Information Security Technology 3 cr.
Practical techniques of Data Encryption Technology, Steganograpy for Information Technology, Intrusion Detection and Countermeasures. Use of Python to write system tools for detecting anomalies in data flow. Design of physically secure data housing. Techniques of Industrial Espionage. Hiding and Finding of secrets in the field. Dead Drops, design of Fake ID’s. Use of PGP and other public encryption methods. Using DNS tools to track down hackers. Hiding of information in music and other audio files. Prerequisite(s): E T 362 and E T 377.
E T 458. Database Technology for Engineering 3 cr.
Using SQL in a Tomcat (Java Servlet oriented) environment. Data conversion using Python and line editing for Engineering Technology departments. Methods of transferring data from electronic boards and data feeds, into databases. Use of SQL in java programming. Remote programming of computers for running database systems in a mixed OS environment. Generation of web pages directly from Database queries. Prerequisite(s): E T 362.
E T 462. Remote Access Operating Systems and Advanced Scripting 3 cr.
Concepts relating to operating systems applications and interfacing with an introduction to systems administration. Scripting using Python and Unix. Design and control of Web servers using CGI programming. Prerequisite(s): E T 362.
E T 463. Computer Systems Administration 3 cr.
A continuation of topics in computer systems administration from E T 462. Prerequisite(s): E T 462 and E T 255.
E T 464. Advanced Windows Server Administration 3 cr.
Learn about configuration and maintenance of programs in Windows Server such as Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft Exchange, Oracle, DHCP, DNS, Apache WebServer, Tomcat Server, Load Balancing, Backups, File Sharing, Remote Administration and more. Prerequisite(s): E T 458 and E T 462.
E T 468. Applications of Electronic Devices 3 cr. (2+3P)
Study of the applications of analog and digital devices as they are commonly used in data acquisition systems. Includes basic construction and diagnostic skills. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing.
E T 469. Data Acquisition and Computer Interfacing 3 cr. (2+3P)
Survey of computers and associated hardware available to the research community. Includes practical digital signal processing methods and an overview of transducers. Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing and E T 468 or consent of instructor.
E T 470. Data Analysis and Acquisition 3 cr. (2+3P)
The use of hardware and software to establish a unified and efficient data collection and analysis system. Prerequisites: senior or graduate standing and E T 469 or consent of instructor.
E T 472. Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) 3 cr.
Traffic flow theory, telecommunication and information technology application in transportation, system architecture and standards, transportation management, incident and emergency management, corridor management, dynamic route guidance, in-vehicle systems, and traffic signal timing. Consent of instructor required.
E T 477. Computer Networking II 3 cr.
Advanced concepts in computer network design and applications including managing the campus network, virtual LANs (VLAN), network security, wireless networks, high-speed optical networks, voice over IP, and Linux networking. Prerequisite(s): E T 377.
E T 479. Developing and Managing Educational Networks 3 cr.
For educators who plan to manage technology resources in schools. Focuses on operating systems, network capabilities and management, connections and transfer of files between different computer platforms, and managing peripheral devices. Prerequisite: EDUC 568 or consent of instructor. Same as EDLT 529.
E T 480. Design and Problem Solving in Engineering and Technology 3 cr.
Development of problem-solving and critical-thinking abilities through design, analysis, and implementation of projects in selected areas of technology and engineering. Intended for mathematics, science, and technology educators. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.
E T 482. Concepts in Computer Integrated Manufacturing 3 cr. (2+2P)
Current manufacturing concepts regarding the data, hardware, and software necessary for a computer integrated manufacturing system. Prerequisites: senior standing and consent of instructor. Same as I E 482 and M E 482.
E T 490. Selected Topics 1-3 cr.
Selected topics in engineering technology and related areas. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

FREN- FRENCH

FREN 451. Special Topics in French 1-3 cr.
Selected topics relating to the cultures or literatures of the countries where French is spoken will be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.
FREN 453. Independent Studies in French 1-3 cr.
Individualized, self-paced, projects for advanced students. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.
FREN 462. Advanced Contemporary French Culture 3 cr.
Advanced study of institutions, lifestyles and popular attitudes in modern France. Emphasis on everyday life rather than prestigious monuments in civilizations. Prerequisite: FREN 212 or consent of instructor.
FREN 471. The French Novel 3 cr.
Development of the novel and analysis of selected texts with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite(s): FREN 212 or consent of instructor.
FREN 472. The French Short Story 3 cr.
Study and discussion of French short stories through the ages. Prerequisite(s): FREN 212 or consent of instructor.
FREN 478. Studies in Francophone Cultures Around the World 3 cr.
Advanced studies of representative Francophone cultures through their history, literature, music, and films. Prerequisite(s): FREN 212 or consent of instructor.
FREN 480. Contrastive Stylistics of the French and English Languages 3 cr.
Close analysis of convergences and divergences of the two languages in vocabulary, syntax and style. Initiation to literary translation. Prerequisite: FREN 212 or consent of instructor.
FREN 485. Advanced French Civilization 3 cr.
Advanced study of important events in French civilization from its origins to the twentieth century through the study and discussion of history, literature, fine arts and politics. Prerequisite(s): FREN 212 or consent of instructor.
FREN 486. Advanced Contemporary Women Writers in French 3 cr.
Advanced study of literary texts by contemporary women writers in France and the Francophone world; emphasizes the cultural contexts that have defined women’s relationship to writing. Selections will vary from year to year. Prerequisite(s): FREN 212 or consent of instructor.

G S- GRADUATE SCHOOL COURSES

G S 500. Masters Non-Thesis Final Exam Credit 1 cr.
Course for non-thesis masters students who have completed all program requirements except the final comprehensive exam. Prerequisites: advisor signature required. A maximum of 12 credits may be earned. Graded S/U.
G S 599. Master’s Thesis 0-88 cr.
Thesis.
G S 600. Doctoral Research 1-88 cr.
Course number is used for assigning credit for research performed prior to successful completion of the doctoral comprehensive examination.
G S 700. Doctoral Dissertation 0-88 cr.
Dissertation.

GER- GERMAN

GER 451. Special Topics in German 1-3 cr.
Selected topics in German language, literature, or area studies, announced in Schedule of Classes. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.
GER 453. Independent Studies in German 1-3 cr.
Individualized, self-paced projects, for advanced students. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.
GER 466. Theatre Workshop in German 3 cr.
Seminar. Practical exercise in dramatic interpretation, also play production. Prerequisite: GER 212 or consent of instructor. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

ICT- INFORMATION AND COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY

ICT 450. Advanced Topics in Information and Communication Technology 3 cr.
Addresses the latest advances and topics in information and communication technology. Prerequisite(s): ICT 362.
ICT 456. Analysis of Physical Security Systems 3 cr.
The design, analysis and implementation of security systems and subsystems including threat detection and response, information and communications, security, and physical protection. Prerequisite(s): junior standing.
ICT 457. Introduction to Information Security Technology 3 cr.
Practical techniques of Data Encryption Technology, Steganography for Information Technology, Intrusion Detection and Countermeasures. Use of Python to write system tools for detecting anomalies in data flow. Design of physically secure data housing. Techniques of Industrial Espionage. Hiding and finding of secrets in the field. Dead drops, design of Fake ID’s. Use of PGP and other public encryption methods. Using DNS tools to track down hackers. Hiding of information in music and other audio files. Prerequisite(s): ICT 377 or E T 377.
ICT 458. Database Design and Applications 3 cr.
Using SQL in a Tomcat (Java Sevlet oriented) environment. Data conversion using Python and line editing for Engineering Technology departments. Methods of transferring data from electronic boards and data feeds, into databases. Use of SQL in java programming. Remote programming of Computers for running database systems in a mixed OS environment. Generation of web pages directly from Database queries. Prerequisite(s): ICT 362 or E T 362.
ICT 460. Advanced Topics in Multimedia Technologies 3 cr.
Addresses the latest multimedia technology advances and how they apply to the information and communication technology fields. Prerequisite(s): ICT 362 or E T 362.
ICT 462. Remote Access Operating Systems 3 cr.
Concepts relating to operating systems applications and interfacing with an introduction to systems administration. Setup and control of web servers and all common UNIX tasks. Prerequisite(s): ICT 362 or E T 362.
ICT 463. Computer Systems Administration 3 cr.
A continuation of topics in computer systems administration from ICT 462. Prerequisite(s): ICT 462 or E T 462.
ICT 477. Computer Networking II 3 cr.
Advanced concepts in computer network design and applications including managing the campus networks, virtual LANs (VLAN), network security, wireless networks, high-speed optical networks, voice over IP, and Linux networking. Prerequisite(s): ICT 377 or E T 377.

JPNS- Japanese

JPNS 453. Independent Studies in Japanese 1-3 cr.
Individualized, self-paced projects for advanced students.

JOUR- JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION

JOUR 460. Public Relations Promotion in Sports 3 cr.
Examination of sports as a business and how public relations promotion is executed in professional sports franchises.
JOUR 476. Public Relations Cases and Problems 3 cr.
The study and solving of problems in the mass media industry. Prerequisite: JOUR 374.
JOUR 482. Broadcast Business and Regulation 3 cr.
Station organization and management of commercial and public radio and television; FCC regulations; programming, sales, ratings.
JOUR 484. Public Opinion 3 cr.
Seminar on forces which help form public opinion; individual projects in attitude measurement; measuring effectiveness of mass communication.
JOUR 489. Mass Media Research 3 cr.
Examination of the role of empirical research in solving mass communication problems. Survey techniques, field studies, content analysis, data analysis.
JOUR 490. Advertising Campaigns 3 cr.
Capstone course utilizing all previous instruction to create and develop plans for a long-term national or local advertising campaign. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite(s): JOUR 300 and 312 or consent of instructor.
JOUR 493. Mass Communications Law 3 cr.
Examination of legal issues relating to mass media in the United States. Invasion of privacy, libel, sedition, copyright, and advertising regulation. Same as COMM 493, GOVT 493.
JOUR 494. Special Topics 3 cr.
Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes.
JOUR 499. Independent Study in Mass Communications 1-3 cr.
Individual study directed by consenting instructor with prior approval of department head. Prerequisites: 2.5 GPA and consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

LANG- LANGUAGES

LANG 451. Special Topics 1-3 cr.
Selected topics relating to cultures or literatures of a specific country. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.
LANG 453. Independent Studies 1-3 cr.
Individualized, self-paced projects for advanced students. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated under different subtitles for a maximum of 6 credits.

LING-LINGUISTICS

LING 451. Independent Studies in Linguistics 1-3 cr.
Individual or group study of selected topics. To be identified by subtitle. Prerequisites: LING 200G and prior arrangement with faculty supervisor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.
LING 500. Introduction to Linguistics 3 cr.
Survey of the main branches of linguistics: phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, language acquisition, sociolinguistics, historical linguistics, and some of the theoretical issues in the field.
LING 501. Introduction to Psycholinguistics 3 cr.
Students will be responsible for all requirements of LING 301 and will undertake independent directed research. Prerequisite: PSY 201G. Same as PSY 501.
LING 502. Graduate Study in Sociolinguistics 3 cr.
Study of how social identity, including factors such as ethnicity, age gender, education, and socio-economic class is expressed in language systems. Prerequisites: LING 200G or LING 500 recommended.
LING 503. Exploring Language Systems- Grad 3 cr.
Students will be responsible for all requirements of LING 303 and will undertake independent directed research. Prerequisite(s): LING 200 or LING 500.
LING 505. Selected Topics 3 cr.
Studies, varying from year to year, in linguistics.

M SC- MILITARY SCIENCE

M SC 465. Leading Small Organization - Graduate Level 3 cr.
Practical opportunities to lead small groups in situations of graduated complexity. Use of small unit defensive tactics and opportunities to conduct training for graduate students. Leader Lab M SC 465L, three physical fitness sessions per week and weekend exercises required. Research paper required. Prerequisite: consent of PMS. Corequisite: MSC 465L.. No S/U option.
M SC 465 L. Advanced Course Leadership Lab - Graduate Level 1 cr.
Planning, coordination, execution and evaluation of training and activities with basic course students and ROTC program. Students develop and refine leadership skills in positions of responsibility. Open only to students taking MSC 465. Prerequisite: consent of PMS. Corequisite: MSC 465.
M SC 466. Graduate-Level Leading Small Organizations 3 cr.
Open only to students taking M SC graduate-level courses. Delegation and supervision based on case studies. Use of ethical decision making to enhance team performance. Three physical fitness sessions per week, weekend exercises, and a research paper required. Prerequisite: consent of PMS. Corequisite: M SC 466L.
M SC 466 L. Graduate-Level Leading Small Organizations Lab 1 cr.
Open only to students taking M SC graduate-level courses.
M SC 501. Leadership Challenges and Goal Setting 3 cr. (3+1P)
Planning, conducting, and evaluating activities of ROTC cadet organization. Articulation of goals and plans to attain them. Assessment of organizational skills and development of strategies to improve group cohesion. Leadership lab, three physical fitness sessions per week, weekend exercise, and research paper required. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite(s): Consent of PMS. Corequisite(s): M SC 401L.
M SC 502. Transition to Lieutenant 3 cr. (3+1P)
Continuation of M SC 501. Identification and resolution of ethical dilemmas. Counseling and motivation techniques. Examination of tradition and law for officers. Leadership lab, three physical fitness sessions per week, weekend exercises, and research paper required. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite(s): Consent of PMS. Corequisite(s): M SC 402L.

PHIL- PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 463. Independent Studies 1-3 cr.
For students with a strong background in philosophy. Independent work in a specific area. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.
PHIL 532. Advance Studies in Ethics and Global Poverty 3 cr.
Advanced philosophical scrutiny of and moral reflection on various aspects of global poverty and foreign aid. For example: Is poverty fundamentally a lack of income, or can it be understood as a failure to meet basic needs, or as a lack of valuable freedom? Do human rights exist? What, if any, are the moral obligations of rich countries to poor countries? Can foreign aid be immoral? How should the answers to these questions influence public policy?
PHIL 540. Science and Ethics 1-3 cr.
Ethical concerns facing researchers in the basic and applied biological sciences. Coverage of responsible conduct in research including scientific integrity and research misconduct, mentor/trainee responsibilities, data management, authorship, publication practices, human subjects, animal welfare, intellectual property, conflicts of interest and effort and collaborative science. Emphasis on ethical reasoning skills. Discussion of ethical and societal implications of issues selected from a broad range of contemporary research areas (genetics, reproductive biology, environmental sciences, nanoscience, drug discovery, bioengineering, neuroscience). Subtitled. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.
PHIL 548. Advanced Philosophical Writing 3 cr.
Advanced workshop on writing philosophy papers. Includes how to read and understand philosophical writing, organize a paper effectively, present a clear and forceful argument, and avoid common mistakes. Prerequisite(s): completed 18 hours of philosophy credit.
Pe P- Professional physical education
PE P 455. Adapted Physical Education 3 cr.
Selection and scope of corrective activities in posture and body mechanics, and the adaptation of movement activities for the exceptional student. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.
PE P 465. Senior Seminar 1 cr.
Capstone course for physical education. Prerequisite: senior standing. Graded S/U.
PE P 466. Methods of Teaching Secondary Physical Education 6 cr.
Theoretical and practical applications of curriculum, pedagogy and assessment for teaching secondary physical education. Provides the students opportunities to develop curriculum, teach, and assess student learning through a supervised practicum in both middle and high school physical education settings. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite(s): PE P 315 and admittance to TEP required.
PE P 499. Problems 1-3 cr.
Problems in physical education and recreation and independent work in their solutions. A maximum of 3 credits during any one semester and a grand total of 6 credits. Prerequisites: senior standing and consent of instructor.
PE P 501. Special Topics 1-3 cr.
Offered under various subtitles that indicate the subject matter. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits per semester and a total of 6 credits overall.
PE P 504. Teaching Processes in Physical Education 3 cr.
Analysis of effective teaching and coaching. Systematic observation strategies will be employed to evaluate instructional variables such as feedback, climate, academic learning time, and styles of teaching.
PE P 509. Biomechanics 3 cr.
Mechanical and anatomical considerations applied to the analysis and teaching of human motion. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite(s): SP M 305 or SP M 371 or consent of instructor.
PE P 545. Skill Acquisition and Performance 3 cr.
Behavioral and physiological examination factors that influence the acquisition and performance of motor skills.
PE P 550. Advanced Topics in Physical Education 1-4 cr.
Advanced study in teaching processes, perceptual motor development, bioenergetics, biomechanical instrumentation, psychological bases of performance, or motor control.
PE P 551. Sociology of Sports 3 cr.
PE P 555. Adapted Physical Education 3 cr.
Selection and scope of corrective activities in posture and body mechanics, and the adaptation of movement activities for the exceptional student. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Same as PE P 455 with additional requirements for graduate credit.
PE P 557. Adapted Physical Education : A Practitioner’s Approach 3 cr.
Preparation for qualified physical education professionals to teach individuals with disabilities motor and fitness skills. Knowledge of the Adapted Physical Education National Standards is developed so students may become nationally certified in the field. The inclusion of disability sports into general physical education curriculum is also major emphasis of this course. Prerequisites: PE P 455 and PEP 555 or PE P 456 and PE P 556.
PE P 558. Adapted Physical Education National Standards (APENS) Professional Preparation 3 cr.
This distance education course is to prepare physical education teachers to pass the Certified Adapted Physical Education (CAPE) National Examination, which is based on the Adapted Physical Education National Standards (APENS). These standards were developed by professionals in the field to ensure that physical education instruction for students with disabilities is provided by qualified physical education teachers.

PORT- Portuguese

PORT 451. Special Topics in Luso-Brazilian Studies 3 cr.
Selected topics relating to Luso-Brazilian cultures and literatures. Topic to be announced in the schedule of classes. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
PORT 453. Independent Luso-Brazilian Studies 1-3 cr.
Individualized, self-paced projects for advanced students in Luso-Brazilian studies.
PORT 513. Graduate Portuguese for Romance Language Students I 3 cr.
Portuguese for beginners at the graduate level. May be completed on campus or via Study Abroad. Credit can be applied towards fulfilling the second language requirement. Credit is not accepted towards any graduate level major or minor.
PORT 514. Graduate Portuguese for Romance Language Students II 3 cr.
Portuguese for beginners at the graduate level. May be completed on campus or via Study Abroad. Credit can be applied towards fulfilling the second language requirement. Credit is not accepted towards any graduate level major or minor. Prerequisite(s): Language placement exam or C or better in PORT 513, or consent of instructor.

PDC- PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT CREDIT

PDC 503. Professional Development Credit in Educational Technology 1-6 cr.
Special topics course in educational technology covering professional development for educators to support the improvement of professional practice in schools. Recommended that this course not be accepted for licensure. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. S/U only.
PDC 801. Introduction to Postdoctoral Training in Psychopharmacology for Psychologists 4 cr.
Course I provides the basic understanding of neurology, physiology, and pharmacy as needed to understand the applications of psychotropics in the treatment of emotional disorders. Course taught in the Weekend College format over three sessions. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Graded S/U. PDC. 802. Postdoctoral Training in Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacokinetics for Psychologists 4 cr. Course II provides advanced training in the diagnosis of emotional disorders and selection of appropriate medications to assist in treatment. Course taught in the Weekend College format over three sessions. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Graded S/U.
PDC 802. Postdoctoral Training in Pharmacodynamics and Pharmacokinetics for Psychologists 4 cr.
Course II provides advanced training in the diagnosis of emotional disorders and selection of appropriate medications to assist in treatment. Course taught in the Weekend College format over three sessions. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Graded S/U.
PDC 804. Postdoctoral Training in Pathophysiology for Psychologists 4 cr.
Course IV is an applied course in medical and mental history taking. Covers how to measure and record vital signs; how to order and interpret basic laboratory tests; and the bases for ruling out underlying medical conditions. Includes a practicum in a clinic setting. Course taught in the Weekend College format over four sessions plus practicum time. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Graded S/U.
PDC 808. Pathophysiology and Treatment of Substance Dependence Disorders 4 cr.
Etiology of various substance addictions is studied, then multimodal means of interventions are presented. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Graded S/U.
PDC 809. Special Topics in Psychopharmacological Treatment 4 cr.
Current issues such as new medications, changes in diagnostic procedures, and ethical/legal concerns. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Graded S/U.
PDC 810. Preceptorship 3-6 cr.
Students will work under the close supervision of a physician with expertise in psychopharmacology, treating 100 patients for 400 hours in relevant settings. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Restricted to C EP majors. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

SP M- SPORTS MEDICINE

SP M 451. Advanced Exercise Physiology 3 cr.
Detailed study of the integrated response of neuromuscular, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems to acute and chronic exercise, nutrition, and environmental conditions with a strong emphasis on laboratory experiences. Prerequisite(s): SP M 271 and SP M 308 or consent of instructor.
SP M 456. Exercise for Special Populations 3 cr.
Fundamentals of kinesiology adapted for adults with various diseases and disabilities. Focus will be on the application of exercise assessment and prescription for selected conditions. Prerequisite(s): SPM 308 and SPM 330 or SPM 460.
SP M 458. Physical Dimensions of Aging 3 cr.
This course introduces students to physical, physiological, social, mental, and emotional aspects of human aging. Age-related changes in human function are discussed the context of applied healthcare settings, and the implications for appropriate physical activity and functional independence. Prerequisite(s): SP M 308.
SP M 460. Principles of Strength and Conditioning 3 cr.
Application of research, theory, and methods of high-intensity, resistive overload training. Performance-specific topics include management, nutrition. Prerequisite(s): SPM 308.
SP M 460 L. Principles of Strength and Conditioning Laboratory 1 cr. (2P)
An applied examination of the theory, principles, rules and regulations associated with various strength and conditioning exercises to include but not limited to Olympic lifting, powerlifting, bodybuilding, plyometrics, speed, agility and speed-endurance development. Lab required for Kinesiology majors. Prerequisite(s): SPM 308.
SP M 499. Topics in Athletic Training 1-3 cr.
Problems in athletic training and independent work in their solutions. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite(s): Junior or Senior status; Consent of ATEP director.
SP M 505. Psychology of Sport II 3 cr.
Application of psychology in coaching and teaching sport skills to optimize athletic performance. Skills in understanding and conducting research emphasized. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite(s): PE P 304 or consent of instructor.
SP M 509. Biomechanics 3 cr.
Mechanical and anatomical considerations applied to the analysis and teaching of human motion. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite(s): Either PE P 305 or SP M 371 or consent of instructor.
SP M 512. Inferential Statistics in Sports and Excercise Science 3 cr.
A graduate course designed to teach students how to use and interpret inferential statistics using the scientific method. An understanding of sport and exercise science theory is prerequisite for students wishing to enroll in this course. Consent of instructor required.
SP M 551. Advanced Exercise Physiology 3 cr.
Detailed study of the integrated response of neuromuscular, cardiovascular and respiratory systems to acute and chronic exercise, nutrition and environmental conditions with a strong emphasis on laboratory experience. Prerequisite: SP M 308 or consent of instructor. Same as SP M 451 with additional requirements for graduate credit.
SP M 556. Exercise for Special Populations 3 cr.
Fundamentals of kinesiology adapted for adults with various diseases and disabilities. Focus will be on the application of exercise assessment and prescription for selected conditions. Taught with PE P 456 with additional work required at the graduate level. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite(s): SPM 308 and SPM 330 or SPM 460.
SP M 558. Physical Dimensions of Aging 3 cr.
This course introduces graduate students to physical, physiological, social, mental, and emotional aspects of human aging. Age-related changes in human function are discussed the context of applied healthcare settings, and the implications for appropriate physical activity and functional independence. Graduate students in this course are expected to participate in organizing and leading some of the class discussions and assisting in the identification of appropriate materials for the course.
SP M 560. Principles of Strength and Conditioning 3 cr.
Application of research, theory, and methods of high-intensity, resistance training. Performance-specific topics include management, nutrition, exercise prescription, periodization, lifting techniques, testing, and evaluation. Course will emphasize standards set forth by the National Strength and Conditioning Association preparing students interested in sitting for the NSCA certification examinations. Prerequisites: SP M 305, SP M 308 or consent of instructor. Same as SP M 460 with additional requirements for graduate credit.
SP M 597. Project 1-3 cr.
A scholarly project or practicum under the direction of a single faculty person in an area of coaching/teaching or sports management.

THTR- THEATRE ARTS

THTR 455. Advanced Lighting Design 3 cr.
The design of lighting for live performance. Emphasis on conceptual aspects of design, as well as the uses of special techniques and effects. Crew requirements TBA. Prerequisite: THTR 355 or consent of instructor.
THTR 457. Advanced Computer Scenographics 3 cr.
Project-oriented course for the advanced modeler. Projects focus on the creation of complex models, custom texturing and shading, virtual lighting, postproduction image work, and animation techniques. Students will develop digital portfolios. Prerequisite: THTR 357 and consent of instructor.
THTR 495. Directing II 3 cr.
Advanced study of directing, with focus on theory, style, and concept. Prerequisite(s): THTR 395.
THTR 500. Introduction to Graduate Theatre Studies 3 cr.
Advanced exploration of the theory, terminology, and integration of the various theatre artists involved in, and aspects of, theatrical practice.
THTR 510. Acting Theory and Pedagogy 3 cr.
Study of the basics of Stanislavski acting theory and their application for the teaching and coaching of young actors. Students will be expected to act and coach acting in a studio setting.
THTR 530. Dramaturgy 3 cr.
A practical course introducing the graduate student to principles and practices of script selection, analysis, editing, and theatrical research. Prerequisite(s): THTR 500 Intro to Graduate Theatre Studies.
THTR 535. Directed Study 1-3 cr.
For the highly motivated student. Independent projects and individual guidance. Graduate standing and consent of instructor required. May be repeated up to 6 credits.
THTR 540. Practical Problems in Theatre Production 3 cr.
Seminar class dealing with issues surrounding theatre production and problem solving strategies for overcoming them.
THTR 541. Stagecraft & Lightcraft 3 cr.
This course is designed to put into practice the theory from the scenic and lighting design course. Topics covered will include basic tool use, color theory, painting techniques, the hanging and focusing of lighting instruments as well as instrument selection.
THTR 542. Graduate Costumecraft: Theory and Practice 3 cr.
Graduate study of the techniques and applications of costuming.
THTR 552. Graduate Costumes: History, Theory and Design 3 cr.
Course focusing on the evolution of fashion through time and the theory of its application for theatrical productions.
THTR 553. Scenic and Lighting Design 3 cr.
This course is designed to develop an understanding and foundation in the basic tools used in lighting and scenic design. Lighting topics include: electricity, light sources, optics, color theory, instrument types, design styles, history of theatrical lighting and selection of instrumentation for design. Scenic topics include : scenic design history, communications tools designers use, script analysis and design strategies.
THTR 595. Directing/Producing Theory and Practice 3 cr.
Theoretical and practical applications in directing and producing for the stage.

WERC-A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development

WERC 466. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology 3 cr.
Same as Ch E 466. Prerequisites: CHEM 111G and PHYS 215G
WERC 471. Health Physics 4 cr.
Introduction to Radiation Protection, Radiation/Radioactivity, Radioactive Decay/Fission, Interaction of Radiation and Matter, Biological Effects of Radiation, Radiation Measurement/Statistics, Sampling for Radiation Protection Purposes, Radiation Dosimetry, Environmental Transport, Radiation Protection Guidance, External Radiation Protection, Internal Radiation Protection, Waste Management, and Hazards Analysis and Control. Same as CH E 471. Prerequisites: MATH 191G, CHEM 111G.
WERC 473. Nuclear Regulations and Compliance Practices 3 cr.
Same as CH E 473. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite(s): MATH 191G and (CHEM 111G or Chem 115). Crosslisted with: CH E 473
WERC 566. Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technology 3 cr.
Crosslisted with: Ch E 566 with differentiated assignments for graduate students.
WERC 595. Special Topics 1-3 cr.
Lecture instruction on special topics such as energy, environment and economics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be taken for a maximum of 6 credits.

W S- WOMEN’S STUDIES

W S 450. Special Topics 3 cr.
The topic of course will vary and will be indicated by subtitle. May be cross-listed with relevant courses at the 400-level from any specific department. May be repeated under different subtitle(s).
W S 451. Women’s Studies Practicum 3 cr.
Supervised field work in community setting relating to women. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.
W S 453. Women and Politics 3 cr.
Same as GOVT 453G.
W S 454. Women Crossing Borders 3 cr.
Experiences of women who cross class, race, cultural, national, or sexual borders including theories regarding women’s Interactions across borders. Emphasis will vary with professor and discipline.
W S 455. Feminist Research Methods 3 cr.
Feminist research practices and methodologies utilized in various disciplines. Definitions of research, what constitutes valid inquiry, how research can be feminist, and what it means to do interdisciplinary work.
W S 459. Advanced Issues in Sex and Gender 3 cr.
Same as SOC 459.
W S 461. Women s Studies: Independent Study 3 cr.
Individual study of selected topic and writing of research paper. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.
W S 463. Communication and Gender 3 cr.
Same as COMM 463.
W S 465. Sex, Gender and the Body across the Disciplines 3 cr.
Ways in which the body is used to construct identities and boundaries regarding race, gender, and class. Representations of the body across a variety of disciplines in the sciences and the humanities. Prerequisite: None
W S 468. Global Sexualities 3 cr.
Generates a global context to focus on sexual identity and orientation, sexual identity politics, romantic relationships, patterns of sexual behavior, sexual regulation and the impact of different cultures on individual sexualities. Taught with WS 568. Crosslisted with: SOC 468
W S 469. Gender and Sexuality in Hispanic Film 3 cr.
The study of gender and sexual orientation issues in relation to identity as portrayed in Hispanic cinema. Taught in Spanish but assignments accepted in English. Crosslisted with: SPAN 469
W S 471. Seminar in Feminist Theory 3 cr.
Current feminist theory. Topic changes by semester. Course subtitled in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: None
W S 474. Gender in East Asian History 3 cr.
Same as HIST 474.
W S 481. Hate Crimes and Hate Groups 3 cr.
Explores the phenomenon of hate-motivated violence. Examines the hate crime laws, organized hate groups and social theories attempting to explain violent hate.
W S 482. Gender and Popular Culture 3 cr.
Intensive study of the representations of gender in popular culture. Examines the historical, aesthetic, and cultural contexts of these representation and the various critical and theoretical lenses we use to understand them.Repeatable under different subtitles. Crosslisted with: ENGL 482
W S 484. Women’s Literature 3 cr.
Intensive study of literature by women, in particular historical, aesthetic, cultural, or intellectual contexts. Repeatable under different subtitles. Crosslisted with: ENGL 481
W S 485. Sex Crimes 3 cr.
Dynamics of sex crimes for victims and offenders; plus consideration of the legal correction systems’ response to sex crimes. Same as C J 485
W S 522. Graduate Study in a Literary Form or Genre 3 cr.
Same as ENGL 522.
W S 533. Advanced Issues in Women, Gender, and Culture 3 cr.
Same as ANTH 533.
W S 545. Advanced Victimology 3 cr.
Study of the risk factors in crime victimization, the impact of crimes upon victims, and the role of the victim in the criminal justice system, consideration of the impact of criminal justice policy on victim outcomes. Same as CJ 545.
W S 550. Special Topics 3 cr.
The topic of course will vary and will be indicated by subtitle. May be cross-listed with relevant courses at the 500-level from any specific department. May be repeated under different subtitle(s).
W S 551. Graduate Practicum in Women’s Studies 3 cr.
Supervised field work in community setting relating to women. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.
W S 554. Advanced Issues in Women Crossing Borders 3 cr.
Experiences of women who cross class, race, cultural, national, or sexual borders including theories regarding women’s interactions across borders.
W S 555. Advanced Feminist Research Methods 3 cr.
Advanced feminist research practices and methodologies utilized in various disciplines. Definitions of research, what constitutes valid inquiry, how research can be feminist, and what it means to do interdisciplinary work.
W S 561. Independent Graduate Research in Women’s Studies 3 cr.
Individual study of selected topics and writing of a research paper. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Graded S/U.
W S 567. Global Sexualities 3 cr.
Generates a global context to focus on sexual identity and orientation, sexual identity politics, romantic relationships, patterns of sexual behavior, sexual regulation and the impact of different cultures on individual sexualities. Taught with WS 468. Crosslisted with: SOC 568
W S 569. Gender and Sexuality in Hispanic Film 3 cr.
The study of gender and sexual orientation issues in relation to identity as portrayed in Hispanic cinema. Taught in Spanish but assignments are accepted in English. Crosslisted with: SPAN 569
W S 571. Advanced Seminar in Feminist Theory 3 cr.
Current feminist theory. Topic changes by semester. Course subtitled in the Schedule of Classes.
W S 574. Gender in East Asian History 3 cr.
Same as HIST 474 with differentiated assignments for graduate students. Required for graduate credit.
W S 582. Gender and Popular Culture 3 cr.
Intensive study of the representations of gender in popular culture. Examines the historical, aesthetic, and cultural contexts of these representation and the various critical and theoretical lenses we use to understand them. Repeatable under different subtitles. Crosslisted with: ENGL 582
W S 584. Women’s Literature 3 cr.
Intensive study of literature by women, in particular historical, aesthetic, cultural, or intellectual contexts. Repeatable under different subtitles. Crosslisted with: ENGL 581