Skip navigation.
New Mexico State University
Graduate Catalog
2012-2013

ANIMAL and RANGE SCIENCES

Department website: http://anrs.nmsu.edu

(575) 646-2514

tross@nmsu.edu

T. T. Ross, department head, Ph.D. (North Carolina State-Raleigh) – physiology of reproduction and sheep production; L. B. Abbott, Ph.D. (University of Arizona) – range ecology; K. W. Allred, Ph.D. (Texas A&M) – plant taxonomy; R.L. Ashley, Ph.D. (Colorado State University) – physiology of reproduction; D.W. Bailey, Ph.D. (Colorado State) – rangeland management; A.F. Cibils (Colorado State) – grazing management and ecology; G.M. Fasenko, Ph.D. (North Carolina State University) – companion animal management; A. G. Fernald, Ph.D. (Colorado State) – land use hydrology and water quality hydrology; D. M. Hallford, Ph.D. (Oklahoma State) – physiology of reproduction; J. L. Holechek, Ph.D. (Oregon State) – range ecology; M.E. Hubbert, Ph.D., (University of Alaska-Fairbanks) – ruminant nutrition; S. L. Ivey, Ph.D. (New Mexico State) – ruminant nutrition/microbiology; C. A. Löest, Ph.D. (Kansas State) – ruminant nutrition; K. C. McDaniel, Ph.D. (Texas A&M) – brush management; E.J. Scholljegerdes, Ph.D. (University of Wyoming) – ruminant nutrition; S. Soto-Navarro, Ph.D. (New Mexico State) – ruminant nutrition; J. D. Thomas, Ph.D. (University of Missouri-Columbia) – meat science; J. L. Turner, Ph.D. (Kansas State) – equine immunology and physiology; L. M. White, Ph.D. (Clemson) – equine science; M. W. Wise, Ph.D. (University of Nebraska) – physiology of reproduction.

Adjunct faculty: C. D. Allison, Ph.D. (Texas A&M) – range management; D.N. Anderson, Ph.D. (Texas A&M) – animal behavior; R.L. Byford, Ph.D. (Oklahoma State University) – veterinary entomology; K. M. Harvstad, Ph.D. (Utah State) – range animal nutrition; J.E. Herrick, Ph.D. (Ohio State) – soils; D.P. Peters, Ph.D. (Colorado State) – landscape ecology.

DEGREE: Master of Agriculture
SPECIALIZATION: Domestic Animal Biology

DEGREE: Master of Science
MAJOR: Animal Science

DEGREE: Doctor of Philosophy
MAJOR: Animal Science

DEGREE: Master of Science
MAJOR: Range Science

DEGREE: Doctor of Philosophy
MAJOR: Range Science

MINOR: Animal Science
MINOR: Range Science

The Department of Animal and Range Sciences offers graduate work leading to the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees with majors in animal science and range science. The Doctor of Philosophy degree in animal science is only in the areas of reproductive physiology or ruminant nutrition.

Prerequisite for admission as a regular graduate student in the department is the completion of a curriculum, substantially equivalent to that required of undergraduate students in animal or range science at this institution, 3.0 GPA, and three letters of reference.

For the Master of Science degree, a minimum of 30 semester credits of graduate work in the major and related subjects will be required, together with a thesis for most majors. A non-thesis option is available for certain students.

For the Master of Agriculture with specialization in Domestic Animal Biology, students must complete 32 credit hours of graduate courses which include 2 credits of ANSC 598 for the creative component.

The Doctor of Philosophy student must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language or research tool, such as experimental statistics, philosophy of science, computer science, or mathematics. Choice of the research tool will remain the option of the student subject to approval by the student's graduate committee. Demonstration of proficiency may be accomplished by satisfactory completion of courses or by other suitable evidence acceptable to the student's committee. In addition, doctoral students are required to complete advanced courses in a field of study closely related to animal science or range science. The number of courses to be completed in the related area will be determined by the student's committee. Related areas of study often are biology, chemistry, or experimental statistics.

The Department of Animal and Range Science is a sponsoring department in the recently approved interdisplinary graduate degree program that offers both a M.S. and Ph.D. degree in Water Science Managment. Program details, application procedures, and funding resources are still being finalized at the time this catalog went to press, but the program will be in place and accepting students in fall of 2012. The degree program is being handled through the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES), and the program description, including application guidelines, classes involved, and topic areas being supported can be found in the catalog under the section describing ACES Programs. Interested students are encouraged to contact the Department Head of Animal and Range Sciences, Tim Ross, at (575) 646-2515 or tross@nmsu.edu for more information.

Graduate work in the department is designed to prepare the student for work in the fields of research, extension, teaching, production, and conservation.

Facilities available to graduate students include herds and flocks of the major livestock species, animal nutrition laboratories, physiology laboratories, meats laboratory, small animal laboratory, 25,000-specimen herbarium, two ranches of approximately 92,000 acres, and a 1,000-head experimental feedlot. Active cooperation is maintained with federal research agencies located on and off the campus.

A number of graduate assistantships will be available each year. Inquiries should be addressed to the head of the department.

ANIMAL SCIENCE

ANSC 450. Equine Assisted Learning 3 cr.
Covers the complex relationship between horses and humans. Students are introduced to human psychological theories and methods of how people and horses can work together and the application of such structured learning settings using horses to achieve learning outcomes. Students will also be introduced to horsemanship including proper use and maintenance of equipment, safety, handling, basic care, behavior of horses and benefits of the horse. Consent of instructor required. Crosslisted with: FCS 450
ANSC 458. Livestock Behavior, Welfare and Handling 3 cr. (2+3P)
Principles of animal behavior and evaluation of management practices on animal welfare in confined and rangeland livestock operations. Low stress livestock handling techniques. Design of livestock handling facilities. Prerequisite(s): RGSC 294 or ANSC 100. Crosslisted with: RGSC 458
ANSC 462. Parasitology 3 cr.
Same as EPWS 462.
ANSC 462 L. Parasitology Lab 1 cr.
Classification, biological effects, and management of animal parasites of man, domestic animals, and wildlife. One-hour lab is optional. Same as EPWS 462.
ANSC 468. Advanced Dairy Herd Management 3 cr.
The course is offered through the Southern Great Plains Dairy Consortium in Clovis, NM, and will include breeding, nutrition, physiology, health and management of large herd dairies of the Southwest. Students must apply for the course through the Consortium, and can take it more than once, as topics vary. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisite(s): ANSC 304.
ANSC 480. Environmental Physiology of Domestic Animals 3 cr.
Influence of environmental factors on physiological processes of domestic animals. Prerequisite: ANSC 370.
ANSC 484. Ruminant Nutrition 3 cr.
Energy, nitrogen, and mineral nutrition of ruminants with special emphasis on digestive physiology and metabolism of nonprotein nitrogen compounds. Prerequisite: ANSC 422.
ANSC 485. Advanced Animal Breeding 3 cr.
Population genetics, heritability, selection, gene x environment and gene x gene interactions, composite development, molecular genetic technology and manipulation. Prerequisite: ANSC 423 and A ST 311.
ANSC 501. Advanced Animal Nutrition (so) 3 cr.
Emphasis on digestive physiology and metabolism. Basic mechanisms involved in the intake, digestion, and absorption of nutrients studied. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 211 or consent of instructor. Crosslisted with: HNDS 501
ANSC 504. Animal Physiology Techniques (se) 4 cr.
Radioimmunoassay procedures. Methods and procedures for conducting reproductive physiology research in livestock. Includes animal preparation, sample collection, laboratory and cell culture procedures. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
ANSC 507. Laboratory Techniques in Nutrition (f) 4 cr. (2+6P)
Methodology and experimental procedures in measuring nutrient requirements and value of diets. Prerequisites: ANSC 422 and CHEM 321 or consent of instructor. Same as HNDS 507.
ANSC 509. Endocrinology of Domestic Animals (f) 3 cr.
The role of hormones in growth, development, metabolism, temperature regulation, lactation, and reproduction of domestic animals, including commercial applications.
ANSC 510. Range Nutrition Techniques (se) 3 cr.
Animal and plant methods of determining quantity and quality of range forage. Prerequisite: ANSC 484 or consent of instructor. Same as RGSC 510.
ANSC 512. Research Methods in Animal Science (s) 4 cr. (3+2P)
Procedures used in animal science research, including planning and conduct of investigations and interpretation of results. Same as HNDS 512.
ANSC 515. Graduate Seminar 1 cr.
Current topics. Same as HNDS 517.
ANSC 520. Advanced Nutritional Management I: Feedlot (se) 3 cr.
Emphasis on feeding systems for beef cattle from weaning to slaughter. Primary focus on feedlot nutrition and management. Prerequisite: ANSC 484 or consent of instructor.
ANSC 521. Advanced Nutritional Management II: Cow Calf/Stocker (so) 3 cr.
Emphasis on nutritional management for cow-calf and stocker operations. Primary focus on applications to range animal nutrition and management. Prerequisite: ANSC 484 or consent of instructor.
ANSC 522. Animal Nutrition (f) 3 cr.
Nutrient utilization and measurement; nutrient requirements for the various body functions. Taught with ANSC 422 and same as HNDS 522 with additional requirements for graduate students. Recommended for nonmajors. Prerequisite(s): CHEM 211. Crosslisted with: HNDS 522
ANSC 560. Rumen Microbiology (so) 3 cr.
Issues in ruminal and gastrointestinal microbiology. Includes physiological and genetic mechanisms in carbohydrate and nitrogen utilization. Prerequisites: ANSC/HNDS 501 and CHEM 546. Same as FSTE 560.
ANSC 598. Special Research Programs 1-4 cr.
Individual investigations, either analytical or experimental. Maximum of 4 credits per semester. No more than 6 credits toward a degree.
ANSC 599. Master's Thesis 0-88 cr.
Thesis.
ANSC 600. Research 1-88 cr.
This course is for Ph.D. students before they have completed qualifiers.
ANSC 602. Advanced Reproductive Physiology (fo) 3 cr. (2+2P)
Mechanisms of reproductive function; research methodology. Prerequisite: ANSC 421 or consent of instructor.
ANSC 602 L. Molecular Techniques in Reproductive Physiology (fo) 2 cr. (4P)
Molecular biology techniques used in the study of reproductive physiology in domestic animals. Extraction of RNA, DNA from endocrine tissues, northern analysis, culture of pituitary/ovarian tissue. Mechanisms of hormone action. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
ANSC 603. Cardiovascular and Neural Physiology (so) 3 cr.
Anatomical and physiological considerations of the cardiovascular and nervous systems of domestic animals; interactions between these systems and how they elicit control over various body functions. Prerequisite: ANSC 370.
ANSC 604. Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal-Pineal Endocrinology (fe) 1 cr.
Hormones and other neurochemicals synthesized and secreted by the hypothalamus, pituitary, and pineal glands. Neuroendocrinology of the hypothalamo-hypophyseal axis. Prerequisite: ANSC 509.
ANSC 605. Gonadal and Uterine Endocrinology (fe) 1 cr.
Endocrinology of mammalian ovaries, testes, and uteri including developing trophoblasts. Prerequisite: ANSC 509.
ANSC 606. Endocrinology of Pregnancy, Parturition, and Lactation (fe) 1 cr.
Hormones and other chemical messengers involved in maintenance of pregnancy, control of parturition, and initiation and maintenance of lactation in farm animals. Prerequisite: ANSC 509.
ANSC 621. Metabolic Functions and Dysfunctions (fe) 3 cr.
Physiological chemistry of ruminants and other domestic animals, with attention to metabolic dysfunctions and nutritional toxicology. Prerequisites: CHEM 345 and ANSC 501. Same as HNDS 621.
ANSC 625. Nutrient Metabolism I: Mineral, Vitamin, and Nitrogen Metabolism (fo) 4 cr.
Cellular metabolism, physiological function(s), toxicities, and deficiencies of minerals, vitamins and nitrogen in ruminants and nonruminants. Prerequisite: ANSC/HNDS 501. Same as HNDS 625.
ANSC 626. Nutrient Metabolism II: Carbohydrates, Lipids, and Energetics (se) 4 cr.
Basic principles of carbohydrate, lipid, and energy metabolism; integration of metabolism with emphasis on nutritional and biochemical processes related to efficiency of nutrient use. Prerequisite: ANSC 501 or HNDS 501. Same as HNDS 626.
ANSC 698. Special Research Programs 1-4 cr.
Advanced individual investigations, either analytical or experimental. Maximum of 4 credits per semester. No more than 6 credits toward a degree.
ANSC 700. Doctoral Dissertation 0-88 cr.
Dissertation.

RANGE SCIENCE

RGSC 452. Rangeland Analysis 4 cr. (2+4P)
Analysis methods used to determine structure and function of rangelands and their applications to rangeland management and assessment. Prerequisites: RGSC 294 and A ST 311.
RGSC 458. Livestock Behavior, Welfare and Handling 3 cr. (2+3P)
Principles of animal behavior and evaluation of management practices on animal welfare in confined and rangeland livestock operations. Low stress livestock handling techniques. Design of livestock handling facilities. Prerequisite(s): RGSC 294 or ANSC 100. Crosslisted with: ANSC 458
RGSC 460. Advanced Rangeland Management 4 cr. (3+3P)
Rangeland survey methods; rangeland management plans; problems of rangeland administration; cooperation in rangeland improvement programs. Prerequisites: RGSC 294, RGSC 440, and RGSC 452.
RGSC 509. Approaches to Rangeland Research 3 cr.
Techniques and methods of conducting rangeland and ecological research. Review of pertinent literature with analysis of experimental results. Prerequisites: A ST 505 or consent of instructor.
RGSC 510. Range Nutrition Techniques 3 cr.
Same as ANSC 510.
RGSC 513. Advanced Rangeland Ecology 3 cr.
Overview of the current state of knowledge in selected areas of rangeland ecology, with emphasis on currently developing ideas and issues relevant to rangeland management. Prerequisite(s): RGSC 440 or equivalent.
RGSC 515. Graduate Seminar 1 cr.
Current topics. Graded S/U.
RGSC 516. Rangeland Ecosystem Management 3 cr.
Survey of seminal and current literature in range science as an applied discipline. Includes a broad overview of interdisciplinary topics such as rangeland climates, soils, plant eco-physiology, plant community ecology, hydrology, and livestock grazing management. Applications of range science to the sustainable management of rangeland ecosystems will be emphasized.
RGSC 518. Watershed Methods and Management 3 cr.
Management of rangeland and forest watersheds with emphasis on the hydrologic cycle and land use effects on runoff and water quality. Hydrologic monitoring methods problem sets required for graduate credit.
RGSC 520. Rangeland Animal Ecology 3 cr.
Rangeland animal nutrition, behavior, and social interactions with special emphasis on rangeland animal responses to plants with antiquality compounds.
RGSC 525. Advanced Rangeland Restoration Ecology 3 cr.
Principles and practices of vegetation management and ecological restoration. Course emphasizes problems associated with rangeland degradation, and implementation of rangeland restoration and improvements. Research paper required for graduate credit.
RGSC 550. Special Topics 1-4 cr.
Specific subjects to be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Maximum of 4 credits per semester. No more than 9 credits toward a degree.
RGSC 598. Special Research Program 1-4 cr.
Individual investigations, either analytical or experimental. Maximum of 4 credits per semester. No more than 6 credits toward a degree.
RGSC 599. Master's Thesis 0-88 cr.
Thesis.
RGSC 600. Doctoral Research 1-88 cr.
Research.
RGSC 611. Principles and Evaluation of Rangeland Restoration 3 cr.
Soil-plant-animal-weather relations affecting improvement practices and management of the rangeland ecosystem. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
RGSC 630. Quantitative Plant Ecology 3 cr.
Applications of quantitative, analytical techniques used to describe and assess rangeland plant communities. Prerequisites: RGSC 440 and A ST 505 or equivalent.
RGSC 698. Special Research Programs 1-4 cr.
Advanced individual investigations, either analytical or experimental. Maximum of 4 credits per semester. No more than 6 credits toward a degree.
RGSC 700. Doctoral Dissertation 0-88 cr.
Dissertation.