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New Mexico State University
Graduate Catalog
2013-2014

THE DOCTORAL DEGREES

PREPARATION FOR DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

Prospective candidates are expected to hold bachelor's or master's degrees from accredited institutions, based on curricula that include the prerequisites for graduate study in the department of their subject. To be considered for admission to a doctoral program, the applicant must have a grade-point average of at least 3.0. Prospective candidates are urged to consult the department in which they wish to study for information concerning specific requirements.

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (Ph.D.)

The degree of doctor of philosophy requires distinguished attainment in both scholarship and original research. The degree is granted chiefly in recognition of the candidate's high attainments and ability in the special field, as shown by work on the required examinations covering both the general and the special fields, and by the preparation of a dissertation. A candidate for the Ph.D. degree is expected to maintain a higher level of work than the grade-point average of 3.0 that has been established for the candidate for the master's degree.

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION (Ed.D.)

The degree of doctor of education attests proficiency in a program of graduate study in which the emphasis is upon preparation for competent performance in professional education. This program is intended primarily for students pursuing careers in which teaching, administration, or school services predominate, rather than those in which research predominates. The Ed.D. degree in curriculum and instruction is offered in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction; the degree in educational administration is offered in the Department of Educational Management and Development.

The requirements for doctoral degrees in the two departments of the College of Education have the following distinguishing elements:

  1. The qualifying examination consists of a written and an oral section, both of which are administered prior to admission to the program. Successful completion of the qualifying examination is tantamount to acceptance of the student for doctoral admission. Residency of at least two consecutive semesters cannot commence until the semester after the qualifying examination is successfully completed.
  2. Comprehensive examinations are usually administered three times annually. The written examination tests the major and related areas of concentration. Within two weeks after successful completion of the major and related area examinations, the student takes a comprehensive oral examination. Candidacy follows the successful completion of the orals. A student who fails any part of the comprehensive examination may present him- or herself for re-examination of the failed part of the exam before moving on to the next part.
  3. The major area of study must be within the College of Education. A minimum of nine planned and integrated credits constitutes the related area and can be taken in any department of the university with the approval of the student's committee. The related area must be specifically planned with the major and minor departments in order for the doctoral fields to be mutually supportive. Any transfer credit or predoctoral course work to be included in the related field must have the approval of both the major and minor department at the outset. Specified course work in both research and statistics is required for this degree. Other requirements are described in the departmental sections of this catalog.

DOCTOR OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Students enrolled in the Doctor of Economic Development are required to complete and pass their comprehensive examination. Since a dissertation is not required, they are expected to complete an internship experience and a Project paper as defined by their program. They can embark on the Project paper once they have completed and passed their comprehensive examination. They are not required to take 700 level dissertation hours. However, they are expected to complete at least 12 credits at the 600 level including ECDV 694 Internship and ECDV 699 Doctoral Project.

A Project paper must be finalized using a similar submission process as the dissertation (see section Finalizing the Doctoral Dissertation of the Graduate Catalog). On the front page, after the title of the paper, the student should indicate that it is a Project paper. Students completing Projects papers do not need to complete the Earned Doctoral Survey. The paper must be submitted to the Graduate School for format review on or before the deadline. The form and style of the paper must comply with regulations given in the Guidelines for Preparing a Thesis or Dissertation. These guidelines also contain detailed information on the dissertation/project paper-approval process as well as information on binding. Candidates are encouraged to consult with the Graduate School on format, deadlines, and procedures before final typing. The project paper is not complete until copies have been accepted for binding by the staff of Branson Library and until the microfilm agreement form has been completed and received in Branson Library.

DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE

Students that hold a baccalaureate degree in Nursing are required to complete and pass all required course work for the Doctor of Nursing Practice degree program. They are also expected to complete and pass their comprehensive examination. Since a dissertation is not required, they are expected to complete an internship experience and a project paper as defined by their program. They can embark on the Project paper once they have completed and passed their comprehensive examination. They are not required to take 700 level dissertation hours. However, they are expected to complete at least 12 credits at the 600 level including NURS 698 Advanced Clinical Residency and NURS 699 Clinical Scholarly Project. Students that hold a Master's of Science in Nursing are required to complete all course work requirements, complete and pass their comprehensive exam, and complete a Project paper. To complete their Project paper, they must complete at least 6 credits at the 600 level including NURS 699 Clinical Scholarly Project.

A Projects paper must be finalized using a similar submission process as the dissertation (see section Finalizing the Doctoral Dissertation of the Graduate Catalog). On the front page, after the title of the paper, the student should indicate that it is a Project paper. Students completing Project papers do not need to complete the Earned Doctoral Survey. The Project paper must be submitted to the Graduate School for format review on or before the deadline. The form and style of the paper must comply with the regulations given in the Guidelines for Preparing a Thesis or Dissertation. These guidelines also contain detailed information on the dissertation/ project paper-approval process as well as information on binding. Candidates are encouraged to consult with the Graduate School on format, deadlines, and procedures before final typing. The project paper is not complete until copies have been accepted for binding by the staff of Branson Library and until the microfilm agreement form has been completed and received in Branson Library.

INTERDISCIPLINARY DOCTORATE

Students wishing to study in the interdisciplinary doctoral degree program must apply and be accepted into a doctorate-granting department. The following requirements for admission to the interdisciplinary doctorate degree program have been established:

  1. A master's degree or equivalent program of study that includes at least 30 credit hours of graduate course work with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0.
  2. Twelve credit hours of graduate course work must be completed at New Mexico State University in order to apply for admission into the interdisciplinary doctorate degree program. Additional course work is required for degree completion.
  3. Evidence of outstanding academic achievement in graduate school.
  4. A written description of the program concept prepared by the student consisting of (a) areas in which competency is required; (b) proposed readings and course work and how these relate to required competencies; (c) objectives and an outline for thesis research; (d) justification for not using an existing departmental degree program.
  5. The student must select an advisor from his or her department to chair the committee and, in consultation with the advisor, structure a committee consisting of at least five faculty members from the graduate faculty list who are willing to work on the interdisciplinary degree program The committee must include at least two members from each of two doctorate-granting departments. The committee chair will convene a meeting to review and approve the proposed program.
  6. University Admissions will send an “Admission Referral” document, signed by all committee members, to the heads of all departments from which the student proposes to use more than eight credits of course work, or from which faculty are requested to serve on the proposed committee.
  7. Once the “Admission Referral” document has been approved by all departments, the committee chair will convene a meeting of the committee to review the student's program and make changes as necessary. In addition, the committee will set the format and date for the qualifying exam. An effort should be made to incorporate the interdisciplinary nature of the program into the qualifying exam.
  8. When the student has passed the qualifying exam and the “Admission Referral” memorandum has been approved by the respective department heads, the requirements for admission to the program are satisfied. Formal acceptance into a doctoral program may be required in order to receive financial assistance.
  9. The number or courses required for degree completion will vary depending on the student's program of study. Interdisciplinary doctorate degree students must meet the requirements for residency, registration, the comprehensive examination, the Final Examination, the dissertation, and the declaration of approved minor. Please see the "Doctoral Degrees" section of this catalog to review the full requirements for doctoral degrees.
  10. The dissertation work shall include at least 18 credits of a 700-level course.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DOCTORAL DEGREES

Qualifying Examination

Doctoral students must pass a qualifying examination. This examination is scheduled by the student's advisor and is administered by the major department. Its purpose is to determine the areas in which the student shows strength or weakness, as well as the ability to assimilate subject matter presented at the graduate level.

Scheduling the qualifying examination is based on the following criteria: (a) for students who enter the Graduate School with little or no previous graduate experience but wish to proceed directly to the doctorate, the qualifying examination should be taken after 12 credits of graduate work; (b) for students who enter with a master's degree or equivalent from another university, or another department, the qualifying examination should be taken before the completion of one semester of graduate work.

The department may allow the master's final examination to serve as the doctoral qualifying examination or may require a separate examination for students who earn their master's degree at New Mexico State University, and will continue in the same department.

Based on the result of the qualifying examination, the department will take one or more of the following actions: (a) admit the student to further work toward the doctorate; (b) recommend that the program be limited to the master's degree; (c) recommend a re-evaluation of the student's progress after the lapse of one semester; or (d) recommend a discontinuation of graduate work. In all cases, University Admissions shall be notified of the results of the qualifying examination.

Upon passing the qualifying examination, the student will be admitted to the doctoral program. The student's advisor and department head will then appoint the doctoral committee to prepare the student's preliminary program of study for the doctorate. This program shall be filed with University Admissions.

Graduate Committee—Doctoral

The doctoral committee will be composed of at least four members of the graduate faculty holding doctoral degrees. The following rules apply to the composition of the committee:

  1. In addition to the committee chair, at least one other member must be from a discipline within the student's major area, which may encompass more than one degree-granting department.
  2. One member of the committee may be from a related area of study other than the student's declared minor.
  3. If an approved minor is declared, at least one but not more than two members of the committee must be from the minor area.
  4. At least three committee members must be members of the graduate faculty in doctorate-granting departments. Of these three members:
  5. The committee chair must be a member of the graduate faculty in the student's department (See the section "Appointments Outside of Home Department" in the "Guidelines on Graduate Faculty Appointments").
  6. The home department of no more than one of the other two committee members from doctorate-granting departments may be outside the student's department.

As indicated in the "Guidelines for Graduate Faculty Appointments," any qualified member of the graduate faculty may join any graduate program within a department. Applicants will be approved by the graduate program to which they are applying, through a process to be determined by that program, before their application is forwarded to the dean of the Graduate School.

One member of the committee must serve as the dean's representative. The dean's representative can be either the member from the related area or minor area or an independent member appointed by the dean of the Graduate School but must not be from the student's department. In programs where more than one department is a participant, the dean's representative may not be from any of those departments.

Departments may structure committees that include more than the minimum number of members as long as the stated conditions of membership are satisfied. Additional voting and nonvoting members may be any person approved or appointed by the dean of the Graduate School. All members of the committee will attend the comprehensive oral and the final defense for the dissertation. No change in membership of the doctoral committee may be made without prior approval from the dean of the Graduate School.

Program of Study

A student who has completed 12 credits of graduate work beyond the master's degree, or its equivalent, in residence at New Mexico State University, and has successfully completed the qualifying examination, should file the “Program of Study and Committee for Doctoral Students” form (also called “Program of Study”) for the doctorate before registering for additional courses. This form may be obtained from University Admissions, department offices, or from the website of University Admissions: http://prospective.nmsu.edu/graduate/forms/index.html. The “Program of Study” should be completed in consultation with the advisor and other members of the doctoral committee. This form should include the course number and abbreviated title with the credit hours. For courses already completed, grades must be shown for both major and minor areas. The program recommended by the student's committee is subject to approval by the head of the major department, the head of the minor department (if applicable), the college dean, and the dean of the Graduate School.

The program of study should be designed to meet the campus residency requirement described in "Residency" and should include a minimum of 30 graduate credits (from NMSU or other approved graduate programs) plus 18 credits of dissertation work (700-level course).

Comprehensive Examination

Before admission to candidacy for a doctoral degree, the student must pass a comprehensive examination intended to test knowledge of the major and any approved minor fields of study. The student will be admitted to the examination after satisfaction of the language requirements (where applicable), after completion of adequate course work to the satisfaction of the major department and the Graduate School, and when considered by the committee to be adequately prepared.

University Admissions should receive the “Program of Study and Committee for Doctoral Students” and standardized test scores (if required by the department) after the student passes the qualifying examination and before the comprehensive examination. The oral examination form must be on file at University Admissions at least ten working days prior to the proposed date for the examination. The examination must be part written and part oral. The results of the oral examination will be reported to University Admissions.

Any applicant for candidacy who fails the comprehensive examination may, upon recommendation of the committee and approval of the graduate dean, (1) be granted a second examination after a lapse of at least one semester or (2) be terminated from the doctoral program. The student must be duly registered for three credits of graduate course work in the Graduate School during the semester in which the comprehensive examination is taken. A student taking an oral examination during the summer must enroll for at least one credit for that term.

In general, there should be a time lapse of at least one year between the comprehensive and final oral examination. However, due to the type of research required in some departments and the method of administering the written comprehensive in other departments, such a time lapse is not always practical. In all cases there must be one semester between the comprehensive and the final oral examinations.

Time Limit

If more than five years have elapsed since the date of the comprehensive examination, the candidate will be required to take another comprehensive examination before admission to the final examination.

Advancement to Candidacy

A student will be formally advanced to candidacy upon the successful completion of the comprehensive examination, the recommendation of the committee, and the approval of the graduate dean.

A minimum of nine credits must be taken after successful completion of the comprehensive exam. A student may not register for dissertation credits (700) prior to successful completion of the qualifying exam. The dissertation preparation shall total at least 18 credits of courses numbered 700. The doctoral committee can impose additional requirements for courses numbered 700.

A student is admitted to the doctoral program after successful completion of the qualifying examination. After successful completion of the comprehensive examination, a student must continue to register for at least three credits of dissertation or graduate course work each regular semester until the dissertation is approved by the Graduate School and the copies have been accepted by the binding section in Branson Library. A student who fails to abide by this regulation will be considered withdrawn from the university, and, in order to resume studies, must formally apply for readmission and satisfy the requirements in effect at time of reapplication.

Final Examination

Every student working toward the doctoral degree will submit a dissertation embodying the results of original research. The dissertation is expected to demonstrate the student's ability in independent investigation and to be a contribution to human knowledge. The dissertation shall display a mastery of the literature of the subject field and present an organized, coherent development of ideas with a clear exposition of results, and provide a critical discussion of the limits and validity of the student's conclusions.

When a complete draft of the dissertation has been prepared, the student's doctoral committee (appointed after the qualifying examination) will conduct the final examination. The final examination is concerned primarily with the research work of the student as embodied in the dissertation, but it may be much broader and extend over the candidate's entire field of study. The intention of the final examination is to verify that the candidate has a satisfactory grasp of the major subject as a whole and has a general acquaintance with the fields of knowledge represented by the course of study. The final examination is entirely oral and is open to the public.

The final examination must be completed in accordance with the schedule provided in the academic calendar. The form requesting this examination is to be submitted by the department to University Admissions ten working days before the examination is taken. This form may be found on the Web at http://gradschool.nmsu.edu/forms-index.html and is also available from the Graduate School and departmental offices.

The student must ensure that each member of the examining committee receives a copy of the dissertation no later than seven working days before the date of the final examination.

Any candidate who fails the final oral examination may (a) upon recommendation of the committee and approval of the graduate dean be granted a second examination after a lapse of at least one semester; or (b) be terminated from the doctoral program. Failure in the second examination disqualifies the candidate from obtaining the degree.

Registration during Regular Semesters and Summer Session

After successful completion of the comprehensive examination, a student must continue to register for at least three credits of dissertation or graduate course work each spring and fall semester until the dissertation is approved by the Graduate School and the copies have been accepted by the binding section in Branson Library. A student who fails to abide by this regulation will be considered withdrawn from the university and, in order to resume studies, must formally apply for readmission and satisfy the requirements in effect at time of reapplication.

During spring and fall semesters the doctoral candidate must register for three units of dissertation or other graduate course work. The candidate must have also applied for the degree by filing the "Application for Degree (Diploma)" by the deadline specified in the academic calendar.

If the final examination is to be held during the summer or the dissertation is to be completed during the summer, the student must register for one credit hour during the summer session in which the final examination will be held or the dissertation will be completed.

In order to graduate in the summer the student must have filed the “Application for Degree (Diploma)” by the posted deadline for the semester in which degree requirements will be completed.

Finalizing the Doctoral Dissertation

After successful completion of the final examination a copy of the dissertation must be submitted to the Graduate School for format review on or before the deadline. The deadlines are posted to the Graduate School website at http://gradschool.nmsu.edu/deadlines/deadlines.htm.

The form and style of the dissertation must comply with the regulations given in the Guidelines for Preparing a Thesis or Dissertation http://gradschool.nmsu.edu/Guidelines. These guidelines also contain detailed information on the dissertation-approval process and binding. Candidates are encouraged to consult with the Graduate School on format, deadlines, and procedures before final typing.

The dissertation is not complete until copies have been accepted for binding by the binding section staff and until the microfilm agreement form has been completed and received in Branson Library.

Residency

The requirements for the doctoral degree ordinarily cannot be met in less than three years following the bachelor's degree.

The minimum campus residency requirement for the doctoral degree shall include enrollment in at least two semesters of classes taught by New Mexico State University faculty.

DECLARATION OF Approved MINOR

Any doctoral applicant for candidacy may declare up to two approved minors in addition to the major area of study. The list of approved minors can be found in the Graduate Catalog in the section called Graduate Degree Programs, Specializations/Concentrations, and Approved Minors. Demonstration of competency in the minor area will be required at both comprehensive and final examinations.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS

The Graduate School has no foreign language requirement. However, some departments require foreign languages for research. These requirements must be met before comprehensive orals are scheduled. For specific requirements for each doctoral degree, refer to the departmental sections of this catalog.