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New Mexico State University
Undergraduate Catalog
2011-2012

COLLEGE of ARTS and SCIENCES

Dean • Christa Slaton

Associate Dean (Research and Graduate Affairs) • Jeffrey P. Brown

Associate Dean (Academic Affairs) • Beth Pollack

Associate Dean (Academic Resources and Planning) • Lisa Bond-Maupin

Associate Dean (Development and External Affairs) • Kenneth Van Winkle

Coordinator, Student Advising • Edward Rodriguez

Coordinator, Student Rentention • Jodie Kenney

Coordinator, Student Records • Hilda M. Olivas

Coordinator, Research Center • Matilda Evaro

Bachelor of Arts–Majors in Anthropology, Art, Biology, Chemistry, Communication Studies, Computer Science, Economics, English, Foreign Languages, Government, History, Journalism and Mass Communications, Philosophy, Physics, Psychology, Sociology, Theatre Arts, Women's Studies

Bachelor of Science–Majors in Biology, Biochemistry, Chemistry, Computer Science, Engineering Physics (joint degree awarded by College of Engineering), Geography, Geology, Mathematics, Microbiology, Physics

Designated Bachelor’s Degree–in Conservation Ecology, Creative Media, Criminal Justice, Fine Arts, Genetics, Music, Music Education

Accreditation

In the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry is accredited by the American Chemical Society. The Journalism and Mass Communications program is nationally accredited by the Accrediting Council for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC). Music curricula in the Department of Music are accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music. The master of public administration program in the Department of Government is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration.

Programs offered in the College of Arts and Sciences prepare students for a variety of career opportunities and for graduate study. The broad curriculum offered provides both the motivation and the tools for lifelong learning experiences.

While the ultimate responsibility for planning an academic program in compliance with university, college, and departmental requirements rests with the student, the college recognizes the importance of helping students work out appropriate academic programs. Some freshman students and unclassified/ undecided arts and sciences students may be advised on academic matters in the college advising center, which is located in the west wing of Breland Hall. In addition, all students are encouraged to contact departments for specific subject area information and career planning.

Students with 36 or more credits who have declared a major are advised in the appropriate departments.

Students should consult the University section of the catalog regarding general limitations for total credit hours, independent study, and registration under S/U option. Students in the College of Arts and Sciences on academic Probation 1 are limited to 13 credit hours, and students on Probation 2 are limited to 7 credit hours. The University section of the catalog discusses registration and withdrawal deadlines. Students may not do additional course work or repeat course exercises after the semester has ended in order to raise a grade in any Arts and Sciences course. Exceptions would be made for students completing official incompletes.

COLLEGE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

  1. In accordance with NMSU policy, students in all majors in the College of Arts and Sciences must meet the Basic Academic Skills requirments in English and Mathematics. See "Basic Academic Skills" in the General Information, REGULATIONS section.
    Basic Academic Skills rules:
    1. Students must complete, with a C grade or better, the math sequence required for their major prior to enrolling in upper division courses numbered 300 or higher:
      MATH 112G, 121G, 210G, 142G, 190G, 192G; HON 210G, HON/MATH 275G; STAT 251G, 271G; A ST 251G
    2. Students must complete, with a C grade or better, ENGL 111G, 111H, or SPCD 111G prior to enrolling in upper division courses numbered 300 or higher.
      NOTE: Transfer students must complete the English course above and begin their Math sequence no later than their second semester at NMSU in order to continue enrolling in upper division courses numbered 300 level or higher.
    3. Students whose ACT or other test scores require them to take a developmental Mathematics or English courses must complete those courses prior to enrolling in the English and Mathematics basic skills courses above.
  2. University graduation requirements. See “Graduation Requirements” in the “General Information” chapter earlier in this catalog. Students must pass university General Education requirements and earn a minimum of 128 university level credits of which at least 48 must be upper division.
  3. III. Some departments in the college require a second language and some do not. For those students whose major requires a second language, the following parameters apply unless otherwise specified in their departmental requirements. A student must meet one of the following requirements.

  • Complete the normal foreign language course sequence: 111, 112, 211, 212. Students should enter the sequence at their proficiency level. Spanish speakers should complete the 113-213-214 sequence. Students who successfully complete either SPAN 113 or 213 or 214 (or all) may not take SPAN 111, 112, 211 or 212 for credit.
  • Challenge the 212 level of French, German, Japanese, or Spanish, or the 214 level of Spanish for Heritage Speakers, or Portuguese.
  • Obtain college certification of completion of a second language at the high school level by fulfilling one of the following:
  • Option A: For those departments requiring one year of a second language a student must pass two years of a high school language with a C or better in the last year level.

    Option B: For those departments requiring two years of a second language a student must pass three years of a high school language with a C or better in the last year level.

  • Obtain, from the head of the Department of Languages and Linguistics, certification of a working knowledge of a second language if such language is not taught at New Mexico State University.
  • Obtain certification of a working knowledge of a Native American language from the American Indian program director.
  • Successfully complete a regular university course taught in a language other than English. A student can receive credit only once for the same course taught in two languages.
  • Pass a three-credit upper-division course (numbered 300 or above) taught in a foreign language by the Department of Languages and Linguistics.
  • Pass C D 476, America Sign Language III with a grade of C or
    better.
  • In the case of a foreign student who is required to take the TOEFL exam, the dean will automatically waive the foreign language requirement.

Students should satisfy the language requirement as soon as possible and take the necessary courses in consecutive semesters.

Please note: ESL or English language may not be used to fulfill the language requirements.

S/U Grading Option

Instructors may establish individual standards for an S grade, but the minimum standard for an S grade in College of Arts and Sciences courses is a C.

Developmental and Applied Credit Limitations

The College of Arts and Sciences may accept up to 9 credits toward graduation of applied coursework, which include Occupational Education courses, BOT, CMT, UNIV (not including UNIV 150 and UNIV 350), ART (applied), DANC (applied), MUS (applied and participation), THTR (applied), NURS, A EN, AXED, AG E, AGHE, COLL, CCDL, CCDS, all lower-division RDG. Credits earned in developmental courses (N suffix) are not counted toward any arts and sciences degree. Students should contact the dean’s office regarding the acceptability of specific courses.

In addition to the above limitation, the college will also accept a maximum of 9 credits towards graduation of applied P E and PE P courses, and ANSC 190, 191, 290, 291, 380, and 381. This restriction does not apply to PE P 185, 280, 281, 285, 286G, 295, 309, 311, 320, 341, 342, and 411.

Independent Study Courses

Students are limited to six credits in any independent study course. Independent study courses include directed reading and special topic courses, which do not carry a subtitle.

Distance Education Courses

The College of Arts and Sciences offers a variety of distance education courses each semester. Specific courses can be found under departmental course listings and the Distance Education section of the Schedule of Classes. Students who successfully complete NMSU distance education courses receive the same credit as students who take an equivalent course on the Las Cruces campus. Distance education courses appear on a student’s transcript in the same way as does a course taken on the Las Cruces campus.

Majors, Minors and Supplementary Majors

Students who wish to obtain a bachelor’s degree must select a major field or fields. For a listing of major fields, the student should see the first page of this chapter. Course requirements for majors are listed under individual departments. Students should consult the department for current admissions requirements. Until a major is selected, the student is designated as unclassified.

Each major consists of not less than 20 credits of upper-division courses (300 and above) in a specific field. Students must earn a grade of C or better for all course requirements for a major, minor, or supplementary major, including any courses required from outside the department. Students may not count an S grade towards completion of any major, minor or supplementary major requirement unless a course is automatically S/U for all enrolled students. A student may not earn a minor that bears the same name as a bachelor’s degree that the student also earns. (For example, a student earning a B.S. in Biology cannot also earn a minor in Biology.) Some departments also require specific courses outside the major field. Please refer to the departmental section of the catalog for specific nondepartmental requirements. These nondepartmental requirements must be passed with a grade of C or better. It is imperative that students consult the departmental sections of this catalog and the concerned department or departments for advice in planning to fulfill requirements for declared majors.

The requirements for academic minors in the College of Arts and Sciences are found under each offering department or program’s section of this catalog. Requirements for supplementary majors are found as follows: the Supplementary Majors in Chicano Studies, Latin American Studies, and Linguistics are listed under Languages and Linguistics; the Supplementary Major in Law and Society is listed under Government; and the Supplementary Major in Applied Mathematics is listed under Mathematical Sciences.

Most students have considerable latitude in choosing elective courses. These are the courses beyond college and major requirements that a student must take to bring her or his total credits to 128. This latitude provides students with opportunities to major in more than one field or to devise interdisciplinary programs tailored to individual interests or future career needs.

Regardless of the option elected, students should consult regularly with an advisor and keep track of their progress towards graduation using the online degree audit system STAR (Student Academic Requirements), at http://www.my.nmsu.edu.

SUPPLEMENTARY MAJORS

Applied Mathematics

Committee: Dante DeBlassie, Ph.D., Mathematics; John Harding, Ph.D., Mathematics; Hing Leung, Ph.D., Computer Science; Ronald J. Pederson, Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering; Krist Petersen, Ph.D., Electrical and Computer Engineering; Tony Wang, Ph.D., Mathematics

The Department of Mathematical Sciences coordinates a supplementary major in applied mathematics that may be taken in addition to a regular major in any college. This program is designed to provide a multi-disciplinary education in the applications of mathematics for undergraduates intending to go to graduate school or who are interested in entering professions that require a strong background in applied mathematics, such as engineering, physical science and economics. Please refer to the entry under the Department of Mathematical Sciences.

Chicano Studies

Committee: Laura Gutiérrez Spencer, Ph.D., Chicano Programs, Eric López, Ph.D., Special Education and Communication Disorders, Alison Newby, Ph.D., Sociology, Mónica Torres, Ph.D, English, Iván de la Rosa, Ph.D., Social Work, Loretta Salas, Special Education and Communication Disorders, Daniel Villa, Ph.D.

The supplementary major in Chicano Studies is an important interdisciplinary addition to the undergraduate preparation offered in several areas of the social sciences and humanities. Students completing traditional majors in such fields as social work, economics, sociology and anthropology, history, government, theatre arts, art, English, languages and linguistics, nursing, mass communications, and criminal justice should consider the possibility of completing a supplementary major in Chicano Studies. This is due to the close relationship among the fields and in light of the need professionals have to deal with the cultural background of the Mexican American/Chicano inhabitants of the state, the Southwest United States, and population centers throughout the nation where Mexican American/Chicano culture is a contemporary reality. For a full description of the supplementary major in Chicano Studies and information on specific requirements of the major, please refer to the entry under the Department of Languages and Linguistics.

Latin American Studies

Committee: José Manuel García, Ph.D., Languages and Linguistics; José Z. García, Ph.D., Government; M. Lois Stanford, Ph.D., Anthropology; Elizabeth Zarur, Ph.D., Art

The supplementary major in Latin American Studies is an important interdisciplinary addition to the undergraduate preparation offered in several areas of the humanities and social sciences. Students completing traditional majors in such fields as Spanish, history, government, art, sociology and anthropology, linguistics, business, economics, health science, and mass communications, as well as students from other majors, should consider the possibility of completing a supplementary major in Latin American Studies. Due to New Mexico’s strategic geographical position and the growing cultural and economic importance of Latin America, it will be advantageous for any professional in the areas mentioned above to have a solid background in the field. For a full description of the course offerings in Latin American Studies and information on specific requirements of the major, please refer to the entry under the Department of Languages and Linguistics.

Law and Society

Committee: Nancy Baker, Ph.D., Government; Greg Butler, Ph.D., Government; William Corbett, J.D., Criminal Justice; Danny Scoccia, Ph.D., Philosophy; Kim Seckler, J.D. (Advisor), Government.

Students interested in studying the American legal system and issues in law and society may choose to pursue a supplemental major in Law and Society. The multidisciplinary Law and Society program coordinated by the Department of Government and is designed to prepare students interested in the law by developing critical thinking skills, introducing methods and concepts involved in the study of law, and providing a context for understanding law in modern society. For a description of and information on specific requirements of the supplemental major, refer to the entry under “Government” later in this chapter. Additional information is also available from the Department of Government.

Linguistics

Committee: Patricia MacGregor-Mendoza, Ph.D., Languages and Linguistics (Advisor); Scott Rushforth, Ph.D., Anthropology

The supplementary major in Linguistics is a program whose offerings bridge two colleges and several departments. This interdisciplinary concentration offers an important supplement to the undergraduate preparation offered in several areas of the social sciences, humanities and education. Students completing traditional majors in fields that focus on understanding human nature such as communication studies, social work, sociology and anthropology, government, history, English, French, German, Spanish, journalism and mass communications, philosophy, psychology, early childhood education, elementary education, secondary education, bilingual education, TESOL, special education and communication disorders should consider completing a supplementary major in linguistics to heighten their awareness of the important role language plays in human interaction on individual and global levels. Moreover, in this day of digital text and communication, computer science majors may also benefit from a greater understanding of linguistics. For a full description of the supplementary major in linguistics and information on specific requirements of the program, please refer to the entry under the Department of Languages and Linguistics.

Sustainable Development

Committee: Lois Stanford, Ph.D., Anthropology; Chris Brown, Ph.D., Geography; Martha Desmond, Ph.D., Fishery and Wildlife Sciences; Connie Falk, Ph.D., Agricultural Economics and Agricultural Business; Neil Harvey, Ph.D., Government; James Rice, Sociology

The supplementary major in Sustainable Development comprises an interdisciplinary supplementary major through which students develop a deeper understanding of the relations between humans and the natural environment. The program offers students the opportunity to cross disciplines and construct a coherent interdisciplinary program that focuses on human interactions with the natural environment, society's role in depleting and transforming natural resources, critical issues in sustainable development, and new strategies for conserving natural resources and sustainable agricultural production. NMSU occupies a unique strategic position as a land grant institution in a multi-cultural regional setting, combined with its geographic location on a binational border. Students in different programs can use the supplementary major in sustainable development to enhance their undergraduate degrees and prepare themselves professionally to seek careers and graduate degrees in sustainable and international development. For a full description of the major, please refer to the entry under the Department of Sociology.

PREPROFESSIONAL STUDIES

Prehealth Studies

Health Professions Advisory Committee: Robert L. Armstrong, Ph.D., Physics; Brenda R. Benefit, Ph.D., Anthropology; Mary Hoke, Ph.D., Nursing; Wolfgang Mueller, Ph. D., Chemistry and Biochemistry, Stephen Pate, Ph.D., Physics; Danny Scoccia, Ph.D., Philosophy; Elba Serrano, Ph.D., Biology;

Students planning to attend medical, osteopathic, or dental schools may major in any discipline. Biology, chemistry, biochemistry, and physics are common majors for students entering the health professions, and these fields are emphasized on medical entrance examinations like the MCAT or DAT. Summary statistics from national surveys of students taking medical entrance examinations show that majors in the social sciences and humanities score as well as science majors, so long as the minimal science requirements are met. Consequently, students should not be discouraged from pursuing a field of study outside traditional premedical curriculum. Most professional schools require chemistry, 16 credits; biology, 8-16 credits; calculus, 6 credits; and physics, 8 credits. Students planning to attend chiropractic, physical therapy, or pharmacy school may also choose to complete the preprofessional course requirements at NMSU and then transfer to the appropriate school for advanced study. The Student Center can provide information about the area graduate programs at such institutions as Texas Tech, University of Texas at El Paso and the University of New Mexico. Students interested in public health should contact the College of Health and Social Services about that school’s excellent MPH program.

Selection to professional schools is typically based on four separate but interrelated criteria: (1) evaluation of academic transcripts, (2) evaluation of scores on admissions tests, (3) letters of recommendation, and (4) personal interviews. Students interested in careers in the health profession are encouraged to enroll in A S 305, Prehealth Internship, in their junior or senior year and pursue volunteer community service activities. The Health Professions Advisory Committee works with all prospective applicants to professional school to provide advice and information on the admissions process and to ensure that all prehealth students have the best possible opportunity of gaining admission to the school of their choice. Each student is expected to register with the Prehealth Professions Office no later than the sophomore year. Registration may be accomplished in the Student Center, College of Arts and Sciences. In addition, there is a chartered student organization for students entering the health professions.

Prelaw Studies

Committee: Nancy Baker, Ph.D., Government; Greg Butler, Ph.D., Government; William Corbett, J.D., Criminal Justice; Danny Scoccia, Ph.D., Philosophy; Kim Seckler, J.D. (Chair), Government; Russell Winn, Ph.D., Government

The Department of Government offers a number of undergraduate courses designed to provide students with a strong foundation in the American legal system. Though law schools require a bachelor's degree as a prerequisite for admission, few require specific undergraduate courses or majors. An undergraduate liberal arts program is an excellent background for law school. Students interested in attending law school may choose to pursue a supplemental major in law and society, a course of study coordinated by the Department of Government. The program provides students with a foundation in the American legal system, constitutional law, and judicial process. The program also offers classes in critical thinking, communications skills, and legal policy issues—courses key to effective law school preparation.

Admission to law school generally is based on three separate but interrelated criteria: evaluation of academic transcripts, evaluation of score on the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT), and letters of recommendation. In addition, some law schools will use personal interviews or essays in the admission process. Prospective law students are advised to take the LSAT early in their senior year. The Department of Government offers workshops and short courses on taking the LSAT and periodically offers mock LSAT exams.