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New Mexico State University
Undergraduate Catalog
2013-2014

GENERAL INFORMATION

REGULATIONS

These regulations apply to all campuses of NMSU and are effective with the publication of this catalog. Tuition amounts, fees, and similar items subject to annual review and change are all effective with the current catalog.

University Credits

The unit of university credit is the semester hour, which is the equivalent of one hour of recitation/lecture or a minimum of two hours of practice per week for one semester.

Class Rank (Classification)

A student's classification depends upon the number of credits completed toward graduation. Sophomore rank is achieved with successful completion of 28 credits; junior rank, 62 credits; senior rank, 94 credits.

Class Load

The normal load in a regular semester is 16–18 credits in all colleges of the university. An overload is more than 18 credits. A normal load during the summer term is the same number of credits as there are weeks in the session. Written permission for the student to register for an overload must be obtained from the dean of the student's college. To be eligible to take an overload, the student must have a cumulative grade–point average for the two preceding semesters of 2.5, with no grade less than C. A one–credit course in physical activity may be taken without being included in the calculation for determining an overload. No freshman will be permitted to assume an overload. Students may enroll for non–NMSU courses only upon approval of the dean of their college. Such courses must be counted as part of a student's class load.

Basic Academic Skills

NMSU requires all students to demonstrate basic academic skills in both English and mathematics to ensure that they have the abilities to succeed in upper–division courses numbered 300 or higher. First–time students must meet both of these requirements before enrolling in any upper–division courses. Transfer students with 45 or more credits will be allowed to enroll in upper–division courses for one semester. After that point, they must meet both of these requirements before enrolling in upper–division courses. The options for satisfying basic skills in English and mathematics are listed below.

Completion of basic skills requirements will not necessarily satisfy university general education requirements in English and mathematics. Students should consult the "General Education Courses and Requirements" section in this chapter for these requirements.

English Basic Skill Requirement Options

  • 30 ACT English Score – Students may satisfy basic skills requirements in English by scoring 30 or higher on ACT English exams. However, students must still earn credit for ENGL 111G by one of these options:
  • ENGL 111G or ENGL 111GH – Students may satisfy English basic skills by passing ENGL 111G or ENGL 111GH with a grade of C or higher.
  • CLEP Credit – Students may earn credit for ENGL 111G or ENGL 111GH by taking the College Level Examination Program subject exam in freshman college composition with a score of 57 (top quartile) or higher. See "Credit by College Level Placement Examination" later in this chapter for details.
  • Advanced Placement Credit – Students may receive advanced placement credit for ENGL 111G or ENGL 111GH by scoring 3, 4, or 5 on the English Advanced Placement Exam. See "Advanced Placement" later in this chapter for details.
  • Transfer Credits – Students may receive credit for ENGL 111G by transferring 3 or more credits of college–level English composition, with a grade of C or above from accredited institutions. International students may be required to satisfy the requirements under "SPCD 111G" below.
  • Transfer Credits – from Nonaccredited Institutions. Students may receive credit for ENGL 111G by transferring 3 or more credits of college–level English composition with a grade of C or higher from a nonaccredited institution, and by writing a theme which is judged adequate by the Department of English.
  • SPCD 111G – International students who took the TOEFL examination must complete SPCD 111G with a satisfactory grade.
  • Developmental Courses – Students who score 12 or below on the ACT English exam must pass two developmental English courses (CCDE 105N, CCDE 110N) before enrolling in ENGL 111G. Students who score 13 to 15 on the ACT English exam must pass one developmental English course (CCDE 110N) before enrolling in ENGL 111G. Developmental courses are included on the transcript and will be included in the calculation of the GPA; however, credits in developmental courses will not count toward a degree.

Mathematics Basic Skills Requirement Options

  • 23 ACT Mathematics Score – Students may satisfy basic skills requirements in mathematics by scoring 23 or higher on ACT mathematics exams. However, students must still fulfill the general education math requirement.
  • Coursework – Students scoring below 23 on ACT mathematics exams may satisfy basic skills in mathematics by earning a grade of C or higher in one of the following courses or course combinations: (a) CCDM 112N and CCDM 113N; (b) CCDM 114N; (c) MATH 111 and MATH 112G; (d) any mathematics course numbered 120 or above. New students are placed in these courses according to their high school GPAs and their ACT scores in mathematics. However, new engineering students must take the mathematics placement exam (MPE), and any new student may choose to take the MPE to test towards a higher placement. Placement does not earn academic credit, and placement in a mathematics course numbered 120 or higher does not satisfy the basic skills requirement.
  • Basic Skills Exam – Students may take the Basic Skills Exam, which is offered twice a semester by the Department of Mathematical Sciences. A passing score will meet the basic skills requirement, although it will not appear as credit on the student's transcript.
  • Advanced Placement Credit – Students may receive credit for courses which may satisfy basic skills in mathematics by taking the math Advanced Placement Exam. See "Advanced Placement" later in this chapter for details.
  • Developmental Courses – Students who score below 23 on the ACT mathematics exam and whose score on the math placement exam, if taken, does not qualify them for placement into university–level mathematics courses will be placed into the appropriate development mathematics course or courses (CCDM). Placement into CCDM course(s) is dependent upon the student's ACT score and high school GPA. Students must pass the CCDM course or courses before enrolling in university–level mathematics courses. Developmental courses are included on the transcript and will be included in the calculation of the GPA; however, credits in developmental courses will not count toward a degree.

Satisfactory Progress

A full–time student is making satisfactory progress when the cumulative number of credits earned at NMSU, divided by the number of semesters attended at NMSU, equals at least 12. Part–time students must earn a proportional number of credits in the same time period for purposes of financial aid. In the case of new freshmen, this definition will not be applied until the beginning of the third semester of enrollment; however, for all other students, it will apply after one semester of enrollment. All students at the end of their second academic year must have a cumulative 2.0 GPA.

University Grading System

Grade reports are not automatically mailed to students. Students can access grades and credits by the web using my.nmsu.edu. It is the responsibility of the student to provide updated grade addresses to the Office of the Registrar. At the request of the student, the instructor will provide information on progress in the course prior to the last day to drop a course.

The NMSU system of grading is expressed in letters, which carry grade points used in calculating the cumulative grade–point average:

Letter grade per unit of creditGrade points
A+4.0
A4.0
A–3.7
B+3.3
B3.0
B–2.7
C+2.3
C2.0
C–2.0
D+, D, D–1.0
F0
W — Withdrawal0
N — Grade not submitted0
CR — Credit authorized, but not letter grade0
IP — In progress0
RR — Progress in undergraduate course0
PR — Progress on graduate thesis0
S* — Satisfactory work0
U — Unsatisfactory work0
I — Incomplete0
AU — Audit0

*An S grade is a grade satisfactory to the professor and is normally equivalent to the letter grade of C or higher.

In computing the overall grade–point average, the total credits in which grades of A, B, C, D, or F have been assigned is divided into the total number of grade points earned.

A course for which only CR, but no letter grade, is given and a course in which an S or PR grade is earned will be included in earned hours but is not computed in the grade–point average.

Prerequisite

A prerequisite is an enforceable entry requirement for a particular course. Students must have successfully completed the prerequisite before enrolling in the subsequent course.

Repeating Courses

A student may repeat a course in which a D or F grade has been earned at this university. A computable grade (excluding I, W, RR, AU, CR, S, or U) in a repeated course may be substituted in the calculation of the grade–point average, though the original grade also remains on the transcript. The first occurrence with a C or better grade will count in earned hours. Future attempts will not count in earned hours. If a student repeats a course eligible for grade substitution in which they have earned a D and then fails the course, the second grade of F will not be substituted for the original grade.

Neither credits nor grade points may be earned by repeating a course for which a grade of C or higher has already been received.

Incomplete Grade

The grade of I (incomplete) is given for passable work that could not be completed due to circumstances beyond the student's control. The following regulations apply to removing or changing an I grade:

  1. Instructors may assign I grades only if the student is unable to complete the course due to circumstances beyond the student's control that develop after the last day to withdraw from the course. Examples of appropriate circumstances include documented illness, documented death or crisis in the student's immediate family, and similar circumstances. Job related circumstances are generally not appropriate grounds for assigning an I grade. In no case is an I grade to be used to avoid the assigning of D, F, U, or RR grades for marginal or failing work.
  2. To assign an I grade, the instructor must complete the I Grade Information Form and have the form delivered to the course dean. The instructor will state in writing on the I Grade Information Form the steps necessary to complete the remaining coursework or the instructor may indicate that the student will be required to re–enroll in the course to receive credit (in which case the I grade will not be removed). The student will sign this document or the course dean will send a copy of the document to the student's official permanent address as recorded in the Registrar's Office.
  3. The student is entitled to have the I grade removed from their transcript only if they complete the remaining coursework as specified on the I Grade Information Form, in a manner satisfactory to the instructor. The work must be completed within 12 months after the I grade is assigned and prior to the student's graduation, or within a shorter period of time if specified by the instructor on the I Grade Information Form. If the student fails to complete the coursework, the instructor may change the I grade to any appropriate grade (including D, F, or U) provided that the instructor stated that this would occur on the I Grade Information Form.
  4. I grades can be removed from the student's transcript by the instructor only during the 12–month period following assignment of the I grade or prior to the student's graduation, whichever comes first. To remove an I grade, the instructor must complete a Change of Grade Form and file the form with the Registrar. The instructor may assign whatever grade is appropriate for the entire course. This may include grades of D, F, or U. An I grade not changed by the assigning instructor within 12 months and prior to graduation shall remain an I grade thereafter.
  5. A student may re–enroll and receive credit for any course for which an I grade was previously received, but retaking the course will not result in a removal of the I grade from the student's transcript.

The effect of removing an I grade on a student's academic standing (scholastic warning, probation, or suspension) depends on the date the transaction is officially recorded on the student's academic record. If the transaction is recorded before the student begins another semester, the grade replacing the I is included in the grade–point average calculation that establishes the student's academic standing. If the transaction is recorded after the student begins another semester, the new grade's effect on academic standing is based upon its inclusion with grades for the semester in which the student is enrolled.

RR Grade

The RR grade applies only to designated skill development undergraduate courses approved by the University Curriculum Committee and indicates the student has made substantial progress toward completing the requirements of the course. It carries neither penalty nor credit. The student must re–enroll and successfully complete the course in order to earn credit. The grade of RR may be received only once in any given course, and it remains on the student's transcript.

S/U Option

Students with 28 credits at NMSU under traditional grading, with an overall average of 2.5 or better, may exercise the S/U option. The following limitations apply:

  1. No more than 7 credits per semester or 4 credits per summer session.
  2. Not to exceed a total of 21 semester credits.

These limitations do not apply to honors and courses officially designated S/U.

Each course under this option must be requested during registration. Eligibility must be determined by the student's academic dean and certified by the student. The course must be taken outside the major. If the student changes majors, the new major department may require a traditional grade for a course previously passed with an S grade. The traditional grade change is made by the instructor or by a course challenge if the original instructor is no longer with the university.

Eligibility for S/U grading must be re–established after adjusted credit has been approved.

Nondegree students who do not meet the above requirements may take courses under the S/U option. However, these courses may not be applied toward an undergraduate degree at NMSU.

Graduate students in regular standing may take courses for the S/U option, outside the major department, under regulations stated in the Graduate Catalog.

Each academic college of the university may designate courses in which the grading will be on a basis of S or U for all students enrolled in the courses. Credits in such courses are not included in the 21–credit limitation or the 7–credit–per–semester limit.

Grade Point Average

A student's NMSU semester and cumulative GPAs will be based solely on courses taken at NMSU or under an approved National Student Exchange.

Independent Studies

Independent study courses (including directed reading and special topics courses which do not carry a subtitle) are for students capable of self–direction who meet the requirements for the S/U option, i.e., if the students are not eligible for the S/U option, they are not eligible for independent study. Each college determines the maximum number of credits that may be earned in independent study courses.

Adjusted Credit Option

The adjusted credit option allows students who obtain a low grade–point average (less than 2.0 cumulative) during their first few semesters to get a fresh start. This option may be used only once and is not reversible. All courses carrying a grade of S, CR, C, or better earned prior to the grading period in which the student requests the adjusted credit option (including transfer courses) are included as adjusted credit. All allowable credits are designated on the permanent academic record as "adjusted credit" and are omitted from the calculations of the cumulative grade–point average.

A fee of $10 is required for the submission of an adjusted credit option application. Application forms are available in the offices of the academic deans. Students applying for this option must:

  1. not hold a baccalaureate degree
  2. be currently enrolled as a degree–seeking/nondegree undergraduate student
  3. have a cumulative grade–point average of less than 2.0 at NMSU
  4. have successfully accumulated fewer than 60 transfer plus NMSU credits
  5. exercise the option only during the fall or spring semester before the last day to withdraw from the university
  6. pass an additional 30 graded credits before they may be awarded an associate's degree.

Other courses taken during the period of credit adjustment are not calculated in the cumulative grade–point average. The repeat rule for courses starts anew for students who have taken the adjusted credit option.

Credits covered by this option are shown on the transcript with an appropriate notation, and all coursework attempted is shown. In no circumstances will a transcript of this record be issued that does not include all courses attempted at this university.

Probationary status and eligibility for on–campus employment is not affected by the exercise of the adjusted credit option.

Students are eligible for university honors if the criteria for university honors are met for all courses taken at NMSU after the period of adjusted credit.

Transfer Credits

For the policy on transfer credits see "Transfer of Credits at NMSU" earlier in this chapter.

National Student Exchange (NSE)

For the policy on transfer credit for courses taken in the National Student Exchange program, see this heading earlier in this chapter.

Credit by College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

Prior to or during a student's enrollment at NMSU, credits may be earned through the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board. CLEP is a national program of credit by examination that offers the opportunity to earn credits for college level achievement wherever or however the student learned.

Earned CLEP credit will be treated as transfer credit without a grade, will count toward graduation, and may be used in fulfilling specific curriculum requirements.

A current NMSU CLEP policy as well as test schedule information is available through Testing Services DACC East Mesa, room 210. Testing Services may be reached at (575) 528–7294.

Advanced Placement

Students who have completed college–level courses in secondary schools and have taken the Advanced Placement Examinations of the College Examination Board with resulting composite scores of 3, 4, or 5 may receive college level credit. The amount of credit and the equivalent university courses for which credit will be granted will be determined by the head of the department in which the course is offered. Such credit will be treated as transfer credit without a grade, will count toward graduation, and may be used in fulfilling specific curriculum requirements.

Credit for Military Service

Special provisions consistent with NMSU Senate and Faculty legislation 24–07/08 and the American Council on Education (ACE) – see section Military/Veterans and Family Members.

Credit by Examination

Any enrolled student with a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 currently attending classes may, with permission of the appropriate department, challenge by examination any undergraduate course in which credit has not been previously earned except an independent study, research or reading course, or any foreign language course that precedes the final course in the lower–division sequence. The manner of administering the examination and granting permission shall be determined by the department in which the course is being challenged.

Students may not enroll in a single course, challenge it by examination, and drop it during the drop/add period, unless they enroll in an additional course.

In exceptional cases in which a student demonstrates outstanding ability in a course in which he is already registered, he may be permitted to challenge the course.

A student desiring to apply for special examination may obtain the necessary forms from the Office of the Registrar. The fee for challenging a course is the same as the approved tuition rate.

Courses may not be challenged under the S/U option.

The special examination privilege is based on the principle that the student, exclusively, has the responsibility for preparing for a special examination.

Audits

A regularly enrolled student may register for any course prior to the last day of registration as an auditor without credit with the consent of instructor, provided the facilities are not required for regular students. The tuition and fees are the same as for credit courses. Audit courses are not considered in determining the maximum load except for students on probation and graduate students. A student may not change from credit to audit after the last day to register but may withdraw and continue to attend with the permission of the instructor.

Changes in Registration

Registration changes may be processed only in accordance with university regulations and with appropriate signatures. It is the responsibility of the student to initiate official withdrawal from a course.

Forms are available from the academic advisor or in the deans' offices. Courses may not be added or dropped after the cutoff date indicated in the university calendar. For refund policy, see the "Costs" section of the catalog.

When a student officially drops a course, the W grade is assigned as follows:

  1. No grade is assigned during the registration period.
  2. A W grade is assigned to any student who officially drops a course during the first half of its duration. A student may not officially withdraw from a course after this time.
  3. A grade of W is assigned in all courses to any student officially withdrawing from the university prior to the last three weeks of classes.

A student found insufficiently prepared to carry a regular course may be transferred to a more elementary course in the same field any day before the last day to officially withdraw from an individual course.

Any person attending under Veterans Educational Assistance must notify the Office of Veterans' Programs if dropping or adding courses changes enrollment status for benefits.

Withdrawal from NMSU

Withdrawal from any NMSU campus is an official procedure that must be approved as indicated on the withdrawal form. All such withdrawals will be registered on the student's transcript. It is the student's responsibility to initiate withdrawal from the university and to obtain necessary signatures. Students who leave without following the official procedure are graded appropriately by the instructor. On the Las Cruces campus, withdrawal begins at the Registrar's Office. At all other campuses, withdrawal begins at the Student Services Office. Applicable dates are published in the university calendar for all regular sessions.

Medical Withdrawal

A medical withdrawal applies to a student who becomes seriously ill, injured, or hospitalized and is therefore unable to complete an academic term for which they are enrolled. Based on the physician's information, a determination will be made if the student is eligible for consideration of tuition or other refunds. At the Las Cruces campus, medical withdrawal begins at the Registrar's Office. At all other campuses, medical withdrawal begins at the Student Services Office.

Attendance and Student Performance

Students are expected to attend regularly all classes for which they are registered. Students making satisfactory progress in their classes will be excused from classes when they are representing NMSU on a university sponsored event (e.g. ASNMSU president representing NMSU at legislative session, student athletes competing in NMSU scheduled athletic events, or students attending educational field trips and conferences). Authorized absences do not relieve the student of their class responsibilities. Prior written notice of the authorized absence will be provided to the instructor by the sponsoring department. Specific class attendance requirements are determined by the instructor of the course.

When the number of absences hinders a student's progress in a course, the instructor may initiate a statement of the student's excessive absences including a recommendation of retention or expulsion from the class. Based on the recommendation of the instructor and with the concurrence of the course department head and the student's academic dean, a student will be dropped for persistent absences or for persistent failure to complete assignments. Similarly, a student may also be dropped from a class for engaging in behavior that interferes with the educational environment of the class. Any student who has been dropped from a class shall have the right to appeal that decision through the Student Academic Grievance Policy.

Only enrolled students, for credit or for audit, are permitted to attend classes. A student who has officially withdrawn from a course may continue to attend the course with the permission of the instructor for the remainder of the semester.

Students not enrolled may visit classes only with the permission of the instructor.

Administrative Withdrawals

When an administrative withdrawal from a course is initiated for a student who is representing the university at an official out–of–town event, the withdrawal will become effective upon the return of the student to the university from that event or five class days after the signed drop slip arrives in the dean's office, whichever is sooner.

Nondegree Status

See "Nondegree Admission," earlier in this chapter.

Military Withdrawal

For special provisions consistent for military personnel, see the section Military, Veterans and Family Members.

Privacy Rights

The following information has been designated as directory information and is subject to release to the public under the Buckley Amendment (PL 98–380), "The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974": Student's name, address, email address, telephone listing, date and place of birth, major field of study, classification, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, and the most recent, previous educational agency or institution attended by the student.

Other information regarding disclosure of student data is posted at the Office of the Registrar in compliance with the Act.

Requests for withholding directory information must be filed in writing with the Office of the Registrar.

Social Security Numbers in Student Records

As required by law, social security numbers are collected from prospective and current students who plan to seek employment on campus or, wish to receive financial aid. In addition, the university is mandated by federal tax regulations to provide tuition and fee payment information to the student and the Internal Revenue Service, so that applicable educational tax credits may be computed. The social security number will be necessary to submit this tax reporting. The social security number is a confidential record and is maintained as such by the university in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act.

OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT – Evaluating Your Academic Experience

New Mexico State University is committed to providing its students with a quality education and a supportive learning environment. Assessment is a process of rigorous review followed by implementation of changes to enhance and improve the quality of education students receive at NMSU. For assessment to be effective, students must be actively aware of, and engaged in, assessment activities. Faculty and staff at NMSU will communicate to students the value and implications of assessment. For their part, students will provide feedback on personal, professional and academic development. Students are expected to participate in all types of assessment when asked to do so. Types of assessment activities include class assignments, course projects, exams, exit interviews, standardized tests, surveys, focus groups, etc. Data gathered through these assessments will be published only in aggregate form. Efforts will be made to inform students of assessment results and the program improvements implemented as a result of assessment.

Academic Appeals

Procedure for Initiating Grievance Complaints: This procedure has been established to provide a method to resolve undergraduate student grievances at the lowest administrative level in a fair and expeditious manner. For the purpose of this procedure, grievances are limited to alleged violations of university policy or procedures by the university or its employees, disputes with faculty and/or alleged unfair treatment. Usually this method is used to appeal a grade the student feels was not justified. Under no condition should these policies be used when the student has allegedly violated the University Code of Conduct or a contractual agreement, and at no hearing should either party have a lawyer. Any student who believes that he/she has been unjustly treated within the academic process may proceed as far as necessary in the steps detailed below. Should the alleged grievance not involve a faculty member or course, the student is to appeal directly to the department head or associate dean for academics in whose area or college the alleged grievance occurred.

  1. Appeal to the faculty member: The student is to submit a written appeal to the faculty member within 30 days after the start of the semester following the semester in which the alleged grievance occurred. Semester in this case refers to fall and spring only. If the alleged grievance occurs during the summer session, the student is to submit an appeal no later than 30 days into the fall semester following the summer session in which the alleged grievance occurred. The faculty member and the student are to discuss the problem. The faculty member will submit a written report outlining his or her decision to the student and department head or appropriate unit designee within ten working days of receiving the student's written appeal.
  2. Appeal to the department head or appropriate unit designee: If a decision satisfactory to the student cannot be reached, the student may submit a written appeal to the department head or appropriate unit designee in which the course in question is taught. This is to be done within ten days of the receipt of the faculty member's written decision. The faculty member, the department head or appropriate unit designee, and the student are to meet to discuss the problem. The department head or appropriate unit designee will send a written response outlining his or her decision to the student and faculty member within ten days of this meeting.
  3. Appeals to the associate dean for academics or associate dean of the library: If a satisfactory decision cannot be reached among the department head or appropriate unit designee, the faculty member, and the student, the student or the faculty member may submit a written state of appeal to the associate dean for academics of the college in which the course was taught. This is to be done within ten working days after the receipt of the written decision by the department head. The associate dean may request a written recommendation from an Academic Appeals Board. Should this be the case, the Academic Appeals Board will conduct a hearing with the student and faculty member (not necessarily at the same time) to review the merits of the appeal. They may also ask for supporting evidence for or against the appeal. The Academic Appeals Board will submit the written recommendation to the associate dean within five working days following the conclusion of their process. The associate dean may meet with the student, faculty member, and department head to discuss the appeal (not necessarily at the same time). The associate dean will submit a written response outlining his or her decision to the student, faculty member, department head, and dean within ten days of the last meeting.
  4. Appeals to the dean: The dean of the college or library in which the course is taught or in whose college the alleged grievance occurred may, at his or her discretion, review the appeal upon the written request of the student or faculty member and render a final decision. An appeal to the dean is the last step in the appeals process and the dean's decision cannot be appealed further. Should the dean not choose to review the appeal, the decision of the associate dean for academics or associate dean of the library is final.
  5. Exceptions to the time involved: The associate dean for academics or associate dean of the library may waive the normal time frame for appeals for compelling reasons. Regardless of circumstances, academic appeals must be initiated with the course instructor within two years of the conclusion of the semester or summer session in which the course was taken.
  6. Enrollment: A student need not be enrolled at the university to initiate an appeal.

Academic Appeals Board

Within each college of the university or the library, an academic appeals board will be appointed by the associate dean for academics to hear student appeals. The appeals board will consist of three faculty members and two students.

Maintenance of Records

Instructors and/or departments shall keep records used to compute individual grades for two years after the completion of a course. If a grade has been appealed, these records shall be kept for at least two years after completion of the appeal. Departments, colleges, or library may require that records be kept for longer periods.

Academic Misconduct

Students at NMSU are expected to observe and maintain the highest academic, ethical, and professional standards of conduct. Any student found guilty of academic misconduct shall be subject to disciplinary action. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to, the following actions:

  1. Cheating or knowingly assisting another student in committing an act of cheating or other forms of academic dishonesty
  2. Plagiarism, which includes, but is not necessarily limited to, submitting examinations, themes, reports, drawings, laboratory notes, undocumented quotations, computer–processed materials, or other material as one's own work when such work has been prepared by another person or copied from another person
  3. Unauthorized possession of examinations, reserve library materials, or laboratory materials
  4. Unauthorized changing of grades on an examination, in an instructor's grade book, or on a grade report or unauthorized access to academic computer records
  5. Nondisclosure or misrepresentation in filling out applications or other university records in, or for, academic departments or colleges.

ACADEMIC STANDING

Please see section on incomplete, I, grades to determine the effect of removal of I grades on academic standing.

Academic Warning, Probation and Suspension: When students do not maintain adequate academic standing, they begin a progress of Academic Warning to Academic Probation I and II, and finally to Academic Suspension. Each stage imposes more structure and limitations on the student in order to help them return to normal academic standing. The intent is not to punish, but to help the student return to normal academic standing and success. Since some of these limitations involve limitations on the number of credit hours, students on Probation or Suspension may be subject to loss of financial aid. It is the responsibility of the student to determine the impact of their changed academic standing on their financial aid. Notification to students of academic warning, probation, or suspension appears on the student's grade report at the end of each grading period.

Academic Warning: Issued only once, the first time a student's cumulative GPA falls below a 2.0 while in good academic standing. The relevant associate dean for academics or campus academic officer will send the student a letter detailing the consequences should the cumulative grade point remain below a 2.0 at the conclusion of the semester. A student on Academic Warning remains eligible for all extracurricular activities as governed by the rules of the specific activity.

While under Academic Warning the following restrictions apply:

  1. 1. The student may be required to enroll in a 3–hour special study skills/time management course specifically designed for students on Academic Warning, or an equivalent course approved by the appropriate associate dean or CAO of their campus.
  2. 2. Students will be required to enter into a contract with their advisor, approved by their department head that places further stipulations on Academic Warning. The contract may include, but is not limited to the following:
    • The student may be required to take at least one repeat course to try to improve their GPA.
    • Except for the special study skills/time management course, the student's coursework may be restricted to their major.
    • The student may be required to get tutoring help.
    • The student may be required to see an academic counselor on a specified time schedule.
    • The number of hours a student may register for may be restricted (due to extenuating circumstances such as the student's workload commitments).

The associate dean or CAO may place the student on Academic Probation I should the student not adhere to the stipulations of the contract.

If the student's semester GPA is less than a 2.0, and the cumulative GPA remains below a 2.0 at the end of the semester on Academic Warning, the student is placed on Academic Probation I. If the semester GPA is greater than 2.0 but the cumulative GPA is still less than 2.0, the student will remain on Academic Warning. If the cumulative GPA is greater than a 2.0 at the end of the semester then the student is returned to good academic standing.

Summer Courses

A student may use summer classes to try to get warning or probationary status removed. Under no circumstances may a student on Academic Warning or Academic Probation be allowed to register for an overload.

Academic warning status is continued if the student withdraws from the university.

Probation or suspension status applies to all subsequent enrollments.

Academic Probation

There are two stages in Academic Probation.

Academic Probation I: This occurs when a student under Academic Warning has a semester GPA less than 2.0, and the cumulative GPA remains below 2.0 at the conclusion of the semester or if the student maintains a semester GPA greater than 2.0 while on Academic Probation I but the cumulative GPA is still less than 2.0.

Under Academic Probation I the following conditions apply:

  1. The student cannot enroll in more than 13 hours of coursework during the semester. Note: Students falling below 12 credits in any one semester will jeopardize their financial aid. Should this occur, students should see the associate dean in their college as soon as possible to try to implement corrective measures.
  2. The student will enter into a contract or individualized education plan with their advisor and approved by the associate dean or CAO that place further stipulations on Academic Probation I. The associate dean or CAO may place the student on Academic Probation II or Academic Suspension should the student not adhere to the stipulations of the contract.
  3. Students on Academic Probation receiving educational benefits from the Veterans' Administration must obtain counseling from the Office of Veterans' Programs.

The student must maintain a semester GPA equal to or greater than 2.0 until such time that the cumulative GPA is greater than 2.0 at which time the student goes back to good academic standing. Until the latter happens the student remains on Academic Probation I. The student will be placed on Academic Probation II if unable to maintain a 2.0 semester GPA, and the cumulative remains below a 2.0 GPA, while under Academic Probation I. A student on Academic Probation I remains eligible for all extracurricular activities as governed by the rules of the specific activity.

Academic Probation II: Issued when a student falls below a semester 2.0 GPA, and the cumulative remains below a 2.0 GPA, while on Academic Probation I, or, if the student maintains a semester GPA greater than 2.0 while on Academic Probation II but the cumulative GPA is still less than 2.0.

  1. The student cannot enroll in more than 7 hours of coursework during the semester.
  2. As with rule 2 under Academic Warning and Academic Probation I and at the discretion of the associate dean or CAO, the student will be required to enter into a contract with their advisor, approved by the associate dean or CAO, to place further stipulations on Academic Probation II.

The associate dean or CAO may place the student on Academic Suspension should the student not adhere to the stipulations of the contract.

The student must maintain a semester 2.0 GPA or higher until the cumulative GPA reaches a 2.0 or higher at which time they are placed on good academic standing. A student unable to maintain a semester GPA of 2.0 or higher, and the cumulative remains below 2.0 GPA, while under Probation II will be placed on Suspension. A student on Academic Probation II remains eligible for all extracurricular activities as governed by the rules of the specific activity.

Transfer students

Students admitted under special provisions whose transcripts indicate less than a 2.0 GPA are admitted on Academic Probation I.

Continuing in probationary status

Students may continue to enroll while on Academic Probation I or II provided they maintain a semester GPA of 2.0 or higher. They are continued on that same level of Academic Probation if they withdraw from the university while on Academic Probation.

Removal of Academic Probation

Such academic standing is removed when the cumulative GPA is raised to 2.0 or higher, with the following exceptions: (1) a transfer student may not remove probation by summer work alone; (2) if an I grade is removed after the student has enrolled, the new grade's effect on academic standing is based on its inclusion with grades for the term for which the student is enrolled; (3) exercise of the Adjusted Credit Option does not change academic status until subsequent grades are earned.

Academic Suspension

When a student does not achieve a semester 2.0 GPA or higher, and the cumulative remains below a 2.0 while under Academic Probation II, they are placed on Academic Suspension. Students under Academic Suspension are not allowed to take NMSU courses while under suspension. Students on Academic Suspension must sit out a minimum of 1 semester and then petition the Provost or designee to be removed from Academic Suspension. At this time the suspension status will be evaluated for possible removal. Should the suspension be lifted, the student is placed on Academic Probation II until such time as the cumulative GPA equals or exceeds a 2.0. At the discretion of the Provost or designee, the student will enter into a contract approved by the Provost or designee and the student's Dean or CAO, setting stipulations to have the suspension removed. Failure to adhere to the contract will return the student to Academic Suspension.

Under certain conditions, a student may be re–admitted at NMSU under regular status while under Academic Suspension when satisfactory progress has been demonstrated at another college or university (see pg. 2, Undergraduate Catalog). Credits earned at another university or college while under Academic Suspension from NMSU or another university or college will be accepted at NMSU only after the student demonstrates satisfactory progress over a period of two semesters after being re–admitted or admitted to NMSU. Acceptance of transfer credits that count toward degree requirements is still governed by the rules established by the student's respective college or campus.

Effect of summer attendance

Students suspended at the close of the spring semester may have their Academic Suspension rescinded if they attend summer session at NMSU or one of its Community College colleges. Such attendance must raise the combined spring semester and summer GPA to 2.0 or better.

A certification of eligibility to attend summer session at NMSU after a spring semester Academic Suspension is available to the suspended student who wishes to attend summer sessions at other institutions.

Disciplinary Probation and Suspension

NMSU expects all students to regard themselves as responsible citizens on campus and in the community.

Repeated misconduct and major violations will cause the student to be subject to immediate suspension or expulsion from the university.

The general rules and regulations applicable to students are in the "Student Code of Conduct" of the Student Handbook or can be obtained from the Scheduling and Information Desk in Corbett Center.

Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate Courses

Undergraduates who wish to enroll in a graduate–level course numbered 500 or higher for undergraduate credit must secure prior written permission from the instructor and course dean. Enrollment is by petition only and is limited to outstanding juniors and seniors.

Graduate Study by University Seniors

A student who is in the final semester of a bachelor's degree program and who is completing all requirements for graduation may take up to 6 credits of graduate–level courses numbered from 450 through 598 for credit toward an advanced degree.

The student must also:

  1. File an Application for Admission to Graduate Student Services and be admitted by a department into a graduate program
  2. Have a grade–point average of 3.0 or better over the most recent semesters in which the last 45 semester hours were completed
  3. File a petition for each course by the deadline to add courses for the semester in which the course was taken
  4. Obtain approval by the instructor, department head, and undergraduate dean

The combined total of graduate and undergraduate courses for the semester may not exceed 17 credits. Students should consult an admission representative at the Graduate Student Services.

If the student is not admitted into a graduate program, the course(s) will remain separate from the undergraduate record. If the student is admitted into a graduate program, the course(s) will become part of the graduate record and will not be used in the calculation of the student's undergraduate grade–point average or credit hours.

Program/Degree Requirements

NMSU offers a number of degrees and certificates. Those awards and requirements are given in the college sections. For graduation with a bachelor's degree, a student must meet all of the criteria for the major elected. The requirements listed are the minimum for the degree; students are encouraged to undertake more extensive and broadening courses of study.

Student Responsibility

The ultimate responsibility for planning an academic program in compliance with university, college, and departmental requirements rests with the student. In addition, the student bears ultimate responsibility for understanding all matters of the Undergraduate Catalog.

ACADEMIC MAJORS AND MINORS

Academic Majors

A major is required for all baccalaureate degrees, except the Bachelor of Applied Studies and the Bachelor of Individualized Studies, and consists of at least 24 credits in the major field of which at least 18 credits must be upper–division courses.

Academic Minors

Students seeking a baccalaureate degree may elect to complete one or more minors from those available, and the minor will be designated on their transcripts. Minors cannot be earned after the degree has been conferred.

A minor consists of a minimum of 18 credits, at least 9 of which must be upper–division. The minor may be in a single department or may be interdepartmental. Specific requirements for these minors are available in printed form in departmental and deans' offices. Specific available minors follow.

College of Agricultural, Consumer And Environmental Sciences

  • Agricultural Business Management
  • Agricultural and Extension Education
  • Agricultural and Natural Resource Leadership
  • Agronomy
  • Conservation Ecology
  • Clothing, Textiles, and Fashion Merchandising
  • Culinary Science
  • Entomology
  • Environmental Science
  • Family and Child Science
  • Family and Consumer Science Education
  • Food Science
  • Horse Management
  • Horticulture
  • Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management
  • Livestock Production
  • Nutrition
  • Pest Management
  • Plant Pathology
  • Range Science
  • Soil Science
  • Turfgrass Management
  • Weed Science

College of Arts and Sciences

  • American Government and Politics
  • Aerospace Studies
  • Algorithm Theory
  • American Indian Studies
  • Animation and Visual Effects
  • Anthropology
  • Art
  • Art History
  • Astronomy
  • Biochemistry
  • Bioinformatics
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • City and Regional Planning
  • Communication and National Security
  • Communication Studies
  • Comparative Government
  • Comparative Politics
  • Computational Physics
  • Computer Systems
  • Conservation Ecology
  • Contemporary Social Studies
  • Creative Writing
  • Digital Film Making
  • Economics
  • English
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Ethics
  • Forensic Science
  • French
  • General Physics
  • Geography
  • Geology
  • German
  • GIS (Geographic Information Systems)
  • Global Political Economy
  • Geophysics
  • Government
  • History
  • Human Biology
  • International Relations
  • Journalism and Mass Communications
  • Linguistics
  • Literature
  • Mathematics
  • Medieval and Early Modern Studies
  • Microbiology
  • Military Science
  • Museum Conservation
  • Music
  • Native American Studies
  • Natural Resource Economics
  • Philosophy
  • Physics/Materials
  • Physics/Optics
  • Political Theory
  • Psychology
  • Public Administration
  • Public Law
  • Religious Studies
  • Rhetoric and Professional Communication
  • Security Technology and Intelligence Studies
  • Sociology
  • Software Development
  • Spanish
  • Theatre Arts
  • United States/Border Studies
  • Women's Studies

College of Business

  • Accounting
  • Advertising
  • Banking
  • Business Administration
  • Economics
  • Finance
  • Global Political Economy
  • Information Systems
  • Intelligence Studies
  • International Business
  • Management
  • Marketing
  • Risk Management and Insurance
  • Sports Marketing

College of Education

  • Counseling and Educational Psychology
  • Dance
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Exercise Science

College of Engineering

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Agricultural Engineering
  • Computer Engineering
  • Digital Electronic Applications
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Environmental Management
  • Information Technologies
  • Manufacturing
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Nuclear Energy
  • Renewable Energy Technologies
  • Security Technology
  • Surveying Engineering

College of Health and Social Services

  • Community Health
  • Gerontology
  • U.S.–Mexico Border Health Issues

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

For the baccalaureate degree each student must complete a minimum of 128 credits including at least 48 credits numbered 300 or above. Program waivers require the approval of the Academic Deans' Council.

Each college has its own requirements for graduation listed under its curricula. However, there are certain graduation requirements common to all undergraduate colleges:

  • A student must have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 in all courses taken at NMSU.
  • The student will be required to show proficiency in written English in all class work at the university. Any instructor may remand a student to the English remedial laboratory for further training in written English. In each case, the student must complete the remedial laboratory work prior to submitting the application to graduate.
  • Each student must complete at NMSU at least 30 of the last 36 credits necessary for the baccalaureate degree. Of these 36 credits, 21 credits must be upper division and at least 12 of these upper division credits must be in the major. Colleges or Departments may require that more than 12 of the upper division credits be from the major, and they may direct that certain of these credits be course specific.
  • Curricular requirements for a specific degree may be met by completing all of the course requirements for that degree as set forth in the catalog of matriculation provided that the selected catalog is not more than six years old when the requirements for graduation are met. This rule applies only to the course requirements and number of credits as specified for the degree. In all other cases, the current catalog is effective. The catalog is effective Summer Session I through Spring Semester.

Special provisions consistent with the NMSU Servicemembers Opportunity College (SOC) and other agreements apply for active military and veterans– see section Military/Veterans and Family Members.

Upon completion of all requirements, multiple majors for a single degree (e.g., B.A.) will be noted on the academic record. Multiple bachelor's degrees (e.g., B.A. and B.S.) may be granted if all requirements for the degrees have been completed. Multiple degrees may be granted at one commencement if all requirements have been met. Graduation fees must be paid for each degree.

Both designated and undesignated associate degree residency requirements vary with the college awarding the degree. Requirements for the two–year associate degrees and for the certificates are found in the section(s) concerning these degrees.

  • Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, Education, and Health and Social Services require that the last 15 credits be completed at NMSU or one of its Community College campuses.
  • College Of Agricultural, Consumer And Environmental Sciences requires that the last 30 credits be completed at NMSU or one of its Community College campuses.

Filing Notice of Degree Candidacy

Degree candidates are required to file an Application for Degree and pay graduation fees for each degree sought. This fee ($10 for one–year certificates, $25 for associate or bachelor's, and $35 for graduate degrees) will be included in the total cost for the semester or session in which the candidate anticipates completing degree requirements. If degree requirements are not completed during the semester or session, the student must reapply and pay the appropriate fees. The Application for Degree form is available online through the MyNMSU website. It must be completed and submitted to the Office of the Registrar by the deadline for the semester/session. A $25 late fee applies to applications received after the application deadline, and no applications will be accepted after the posted deadline.

A student must specify choice of catalog as indicated under "Graduation Requirements."

Latest date for substitution or waiver of required courses for candidates for degrees is two weeks after the last date of registration for regular or summer terms.

All fees and bills owed the university must be paid before a student may receive a diploma or transcript of credits.

Graduation with Honors

The requirements for four–year degrees with honors are listed in the "Recognition of Academic Achievement" section.

Crimson Scholar Graduates

The requirements for designation as a Crimson Scholar graduate are listed in the "Recognition of Academic Achievement" section.

Attendance at Commencement

The registrar confirms eligibility to participate in commencement exercises held at the close of the fall and spring semesters. Eligible candidates (registered for final degree requirements, as certified by the college deans) and degree recipients from the previous summer session participate in the fall ceremony. Students who complete degree requirements in the spring attend the spring ceremony. Bachelor degree candidates wishing to participate in a spring commencement ceremony prior to completing degree requirements in summer school must meet these conditions:

  1. Receive permission from appropriate dean
  2. Show a minimum cumulative grade–point average of 2.0
  3. Lack 12 or fewer credit hours to complete degree requirements
  4. Remaining credit hours must be offered in the upcoming summer schedule of classes
  5. Submit degree application and approved petition form (available in the dean's office) by the last day to apply for a degree in the Spring Semester.

Participation in commencement does not, in itself, mean that a student is considered an NMSU graduate. In order to receive a degree, a student must fulfill university requirements. The degree will reflect the graduation date when all requirements are met.

Recognition of Degrees and Certificates

Degrees and certificates earned are recorded on the academic record, as are majors where applicable. Minors are also recorded for students completing all requirements for the bachelor's or graduate degree as of May 10, 1980.

Transcripts

An official transcript, the University's certified statement of your complete NMSU academic record, includes coursework, grades, and degrees earned. Credit hours earned through transfer work are not listed in detail, but do appear as cumulative totals. Transcripts are available as digitally signed PDFs or printed copies. Transcripts can be ordered online at http://mytranscript.nmsu.edu. A fee is charged.

The name on the transcript will be the same as on the official NMSU records. Name changes are processed only for current students. No transcript will be released if the student is in debt to the university.